Again, the more studies and medical research that focus on CBD, the more will be known about its side effects and potential medical benefits. For what it's worth, in December 2017, the World Health Organization declared in a report that "cannabidiol does not appear to have abuse potential or cause harm." The WHO also noted that CBD could have "therapeutic value" for epileptic seizures, but that further study is warranted to determine CBD's potential medical use.
As a healthcare professional I have realized over the years that most physicians and our healthcare system in general are all set up to focus almost entirely on symptoms and the disease state as a problem to treat, not prevent unfortunately. The training that most physicians receive is almost completely pharmacologicaly focused and consequently they treat patients almost as if they are a car to be fixed rather than as a living breathing being.
Cannabidiol is currently a class B1 controlled drug in New Zealand under the Misuse of Drugs Act. It is also a prescription medicine under the Medicines Act. In 2017 the rules were changed so that anyone wanting to use it could go to the Health Ministry for approval. Prior to this, the only way to obtain a prescription was to seek the personal approval of the Minister of Health.

CBD Oil

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