I have pre cancer and cancer spots on my head and face. I have been going to my dermatologist for over 5 years every 1-2 months to have them either frozen to stop there spread or surgically removed. Since I started using CBD cream I have reduced all of my skin spots and have not needed any surgery for the last 6 months. I have very NO spots that need freezing either. I am SOLD on this product as it DOES work for me.
Oils are hot in the beauty world. As a beauty editor, I’ve slathered everything short of butter onto my face: argan, coconut, rosehip, sandalwood, chia, neroli, calendula, mandarin, macadamia, rice bran, seabuckthorn, patchouli, grapefruit seed, sesame seed, soybean, sweet almond, pomegranate seed, lemon myrtle, sunflower seed—even extra virgin olive oil from my pantry when I was desperate. I’ve washed my face with oil-based cleansers, and dabbed expensive mixtures being sold as “face oils” onto my skin in hopes of achieving that Instagram-ready glow. Contrary to popular belief, the right oil is actually good for your face and won’t clog your pores. Your skin needs a reasonable amount of oil to do its business; as a matter of fact, if you scrub away all your natural face oil (as I was prone to do with rubbing alcohol as a frustrated and misguided pizza-faced teen), you may actually be prone to more breakouts as your skin tries to make up for the imbalance. As cannabis meets up with the mainstream beauty world, cannabidiol (CBD) oil may be the next big thing.

The 2014 Farm Bill[74], legalized the sale of "non-viable hemp material" grown within states participating in the Hemp Pilot Program[75]. This legislation defined hemp as cannabis containing less than 0.3% of THC delta-9, grown within the regulatory framework of the Hemp Pilot Program. This has led many to insist that CBD manufactured from hemp, is legal in all 50 states and exempts its oversight by the DEA as a controlled substance[76]. The 2018 Farm Bill is anticipated to provide further clarity regarding hemp regulations[77].


Still, as the saying goes, absence of evidence isn’t necessarily evidence of absence, and there’s a reason we don’t have a ton of solid research on CBDs yet — “to study it, we need a good source, ” said Ziva Cooper, who is an associate professor at Columbia University and was on the National Academies committee. CBD is hard to get because it’s still technically a Schedule I drug, which limits its availability, Cooper said.
Hello. I have stage 4 thyroid, secondary lymphoma..And many other health issues.I use 50mg of cbd vapor oil. 5 drops with each use. Total equals 250mg, about hits per dose, three times a day. I'm also on subsys, which is fentanyl. Idk about anyone but myself, but it's helped me with pain, with sleep, and in general my moods. So I dint have anything negative to say. I just hope that with time, proper diet, low dose chemo, and some other herbal usage, that I can shirk some of the cancer eating at my body... Thanks and good luck to you all.
Hi, I had ovarian cancer stage 2 and went to do chemotherapy for 16 times in 2014. It came back last year 2016 but I did not do chemotherapy or radiation therapy as suggested by the doctor. I am taking hormone therapy at the moment. I would like to use cannabis oil but which one and how much CBD and how much THC should I take for ovarian cancer? Can anyone give some idea?. Thank you very much.
I have been suffering from scalp pain, itching and scalp sores for more than 3 years. I have seen 6 dermatologists and 5 diagnosed me with folliculitis. The 6th dermatologist felt I did not have folliculitis, but dysesthesia. I am interested in trying a cannabis scalp cream, but know nothing about this product, and where I might get it, and if it might work for me. I have had 7/7 pain for 3.5 years and need some relief other than narcotics.
The human body also produces cannabinoids, known as endocannabinoids, in a bodily system known as the endocannabinoid system (or ECS). The ECS promotes homeostasis by regulating a wide range of functions, including motor skills, mood, appetite, and sleep. As we age, our ECS produces fewer endocannabinoids; they may also decrease due to physical injury or disease. Replenishing depleted endocannabinoids with phytocannabinoids like CBD can help restore balance to the body.

Cannabidiol (CBD) oil is essentially a concentrated solvent extract made from cannabis flowers or leaves that is dissolved in an edible oil such as sunflower, hemp, or olive oil. Solvents used can vary from relatively innocuous organic solvents (ethanol, isopropyl alcohol) to more harmful ones (petroleum-ether, naphtha), or even supercritical fluids (butane, CO2). The exact conditions and solvents applied have a great impact on, for example, the taste, color, and viscosity of the final product. Because many other plant components are co-extracted with the desired cannabinoids present in the herbal material, these are sometimes removed by a treatment known as “winterization.” By placing the extract in a freezer (–20 to –80°C) for 24–48 h, components with a higher melting point such as waxes and triglycerides, as well as chlorophyll will precipitate, so they can be removed by filtration or centrifugation [1]. This treatment can significantly improve the taste and color of the final product.
“If you’re taking Prozac or some other medication, you really need to think carefully about what you’re doing, because it can harm you, and you should talk to your doctor about it,” says Blessing. Blessing does note that while the drug interactions are potentially very serious, the doses in consumer CBD products are so low that the risk is likely minimal. Regardless, the fact that CBD has drug interactions should indicate that it is, at least sometimes, in some doses, actually doing something.
The limited studies out there indicate that CBD has, in its various interactions with the brain and immune system, some anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety effects. It can balance out the effects of THC by reducing the anxiety THC sometimes brings, and many in the industry are big on “broad spectrum” or “full spectrum” configurations, which use many cannabinoids at once.
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Side effects of CBD include sleepiness, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fatigue, malaise, weakness, sleeping problems, and others.[3] It does not have intoxicating effects like those caused by THC, and may have an opposing effect on disordered thinking and anxiety produced by THC.[7][10][11] CBD has been found to interact with a variety of different biological targets, including cannabinoid receptors and other neurotransmitter receptors.[7][12] The mechanism of action of CBD in terms of its psychoactive and therapeutic effects is not fully clear.[7]

With that being said, let’s discuss the wonderful thing we call CBD oil. CBD oil is made from the specific hemp strain that is bred for fiber, topicals, nutritional benefits, and more. It is made from high-CBD, low-THC hemp. CBD oil is extracted using the whole plant or aerial parts. Aerial parts of the plant are parts which are completely exposed to air. Since hemp contains only trace amounts of THC, CBD oil products are non-psychoactive.
Given the degree to which marijuana and cannabinoid derivative use has been stigmatized in the past, their Schedule I classification as illegal substances, and lack of FDA approval, valid medical research on the effects of CBD isn’t as plentiful as it should be. Much of the anecdotal evidence, however, suggests that CBD’s neuro- protective, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory effects with regard to topical applications are promising.2
The next morning, I blended the contents of the bottle up with collagen (because I add Vital Proteins to pretty much everything I drink) and took my first sip. I was immediately impressed with the taste—so creamy, dreamy, delicious, and not at all skunky. Settling into my couch with my laptop (lazy Sunday mornings are when I like to get myself organized for the upcoming work week), I continued to sip. Normally, and as it would for anyone, diving into my inbox, scanning the upcoming week's calendar, and plotting out all my upcoming to-dos sends shivers of nerves and anxiety down my spine. I love my job, but it comes with its fair share of stress. Miraculously, however, I felt calm, cool, and collected. As my fingers skipped away at lightning speed on my keyboard courtesy of that 80 milligrams of caffeine, I didn't have the usual side effect of nerves, jumps, or jitters. I felt good, and on my way home from the gym later that day, I picked up a couple more bottles of Kickback. What can I say? I was high for it. Of course, "high" not to be taken literally, as CBD—aka cannabidiol—is a non-psychoactive compound of cannabis.
Oil has become a favorite mode of administration for many medical users of cannabis and cannabinoids for multiple reasons. First of all, concentrated extracts allow the consumption of a large dose of cannabinoids in an easily ingestible form. With CBD oil, there is no risk of intoxication (getting high) [6], so much larger doses can be consumed than would be possible for THC-rich products. Many users who prefer the holistic approach of using herbal cannabis worry about the stigma associated with the typical smell caused by smoking or vaporizing it. Cannabis oil has no smell that may identify a consumer as a cannabis user, and it can be used discretely even in a social setting, e.g., at work or around family. Moreover, it can be efficiently dosed simply by counting the number of drops consumed. These same benefits of using a concentrated extract were identified in a large survey among medicinal cannabis users published in 2013 [7], perhaps as an early indicator of the emergence of cannabis oils as a preferred method of ingestion. Currently, the market is developing further towards more sophisticated and patentable products, including oral capsules, liposomal products, skin creams, and chewing gums containing CBD.
In the last 6 months, I have been experimenting with CBD & THC to treat the aforementioned. It’s been an expensive experiment with some improvement, just not enough relief from the pain. I’m currently using 75 mcg of fentanyl transdermal, 30 mg Oxycodone 5x daily, muscle relaxers, arthritis pills, etc and they still don’t get me out of bed most days.
This is a topic I am asked about all the time, and have been for years: how does cannabis help sleep and health? I’ve heard that the number-two reason why people smoke or use cannabis is for sleep. Considering the recent passing of the recreational use of cannabis in California and other several states I think it is high time (pun intended!) to look at understanding CBD, one of the most active ingredients in medical cannabis.

If your state has legalized both compounds, look for a cream with 1:1 CBD to THC as well as another cannabinoid BCP (beta-caryophyllene) if possible, which manufacturers have seen better results with, Gerdeman suggests. Try Apothecanna's Extra Strength Relieving Creme ($20; apothecanna.com) or Whoopi & Maya's Medical Cannabis Rub (yes, that's Whoopi Goldberg's line), which was designed specifically for menstrual aches and pains (whoopiandmaya.com).


So far, by far the best medicinal relief I have found for my symptoms is a particular strain of cannabis flower called Harlequin — it contains an almost 3:1 ratio of CBD:THC, which is extremely rare and unique in the cannabis world. There are multiple studies you can find online showing the SYNERGISTIC effects of CBD combined with THC. When they are used together, they are much more medicinally effective than either one is on their own. Most cannabis strains today have zero CBD because growers realized everyone just loves their THC, but the Harlequin strain is a god send.
My grandma has advanced rheumatoid arthritis and osteoarthritis - debilitating pain and inflammation. She's on the 4th failed infusion. Nothing was working to control her pain and inflammation. I purchased the 1000mg mint CBD and the topical. I put the topical on her knees, ankles, shoulders, back, hips, and then gave her 15 1000mg drops. She instantly felt relief with the topical. She said it was a cooling pain relief. The topical smells really good.
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I suffer with migraines, fibromyalgia, and arthritis. I pretty much hurt anytime I move. I’m on a regimen of meds, but ordered the Virgin Cannibis Hemp Oil (off of Amazon) and have had it two days. I took 3 tablespoons a day, gagging it down. I couldn’t bring myself to take it today, but I didn’t notice a difference after the second day, and I suppose I would notice something. Was it too soon, or should I be trying a different product? I really need something to alleviate the level of pain during movement, as it’s causing me to be more sedentary.
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