The truth is that no one knows precisely what any of these molecules are doing to us. It is a case of finding the effects first and working backwards to understand the mechanisms. “There are a number of possible transmitter systems that CBD could act on,” says McGuire. “And it’s not 100% clear which ones are critical for anxiety, or psychosis or schizophrenia. But [the antipsychotic effect] is a different mechanism from existing treatments, which is a big deal because existing treatments aren’t working.”
I live in Utah so I have no way to get Harlequin CBD. Is there anything even close to that, that doesn’t need a medical card to purchase. There are so many BS CBD hemp companies that are not trustworthy and I don’t want to waste anymore money trying to find something. My son loves his school or we would have moved already. Help! I need a legit CBD hemp company to buy tincture and capsules. Leafy is my go to because so far all the info always checks out.

Currently, the only official, FDA-approved use of CBD is as a component in a drug named Epidiolex, which will be used to treat severe forms of epilepsy in children and adults, and which will be, Carson hopes, available to patients by the end of the year. Carson says he developed an interest in CBD because parents of kids with epilepsy came to him having read about CBD’s potential benefits on the internet. “There’s lots of data now that I think really supports that CBD helps for epilepsy,” particularly in reducing the frequency of seizures, he says. Anecdotally, he noticed that the same parents reported another potential benefit associated with CBD: reduced anxiety. “I got the sense that some children did get benefits in terms of anxiety, and I think that’s where I wonder if for example CBD in coffee could potentially be helpful,” he says.
Look up Chris Shade (quicksilver scientific) on YouTube, specifically a webinar entitled ‘Cannabidiol: The Full Story pt.2’. He is a brilliant biochemist who has been studying the biochemical effects of cannabidiol. He says that CBD has the potential to be more therapeutic than THC as it up-regulates/down-regulates gene expression in over 400 genes each way (up and down). A great balancer and extremely helpful in treating Lyme, more specifically allowing for more aggressive detoxification of the Lyme and co-infections. There is also considerably symbiosis with heavy metals, molds, EMF’s, etc. so you must also address those aspects. It’s supremely complex and even most Lyme literate docs don’t deal with all aspects. Antibiotics are often counterproductive with persistent Lyme as the spirochetes protect themselves with a biofilm that must be broken down (Interfase Plus). Protocols must be comprehensive in order to make progress. If you have not checked your CD57, do that. It’s a marker for natural killer cells commonly associated with Lyme (a simplistic explanation). The reference range is 100-300. First time I had it checked 2 years ago, it was 48. Despite modest attempts to boost my CD57 with some of the Nutramedix products, I only got 6-7 point increase per year. In April of this year, I got more aggressive with a homeopathic regimen, taking a variety of the Cowden (Nutramedix), Buhner and other products. The next time I checked CD57, two months later, it jumped 70 points… remarkable by any measure. My western blot also went from 2 bands to 5 bands as my body as finally able to mount an antibody response. I can’t say for sure which products had the biggest impact, but if I had to guess, it would be the Biocidin LSF (liposomal) and perhaps DesBio Lyme Plus. But I was also taking Samento, Burbur, Cumanda, resveratrol, glutathione, phosphatidylcholine, NanoMojo, and a variety of other things and a good supplement regimen. There is no one product answer. Cannabinoids can help with the symptoms and support a more aggressive regimen, but addressing the Lyme must be a multi-faceted effort. Be very wary of pulsed antibiotic protocols with doxycycline. It’s not out of the question, but decimating your microbiome is counterproductive.
In just a few years, cannabidiol (CBD) has become immensely popular around the world. After initially being discovered as an effective self-medication for Dravet syndrome in children, CBD is now sold and used to treat a wide range of medical conditions and lifestyle diseases. The cannabinoid CBD, a non-psychoactive isomer of the more infamous tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), is available in a growing number of administration modes, but the most commonly known is CBD oil. There are currently dozens, if not hundreds, of producers and sellers of CBD oils active in the market, and their number is increasing rapidly. Those involved vary from individuals who prepare oils on a small scale for family and (Facebook) friends to compounding pharmacies, pharmaceutical companies, and licensed cannabis producers. Despite the growing availability of CBD, many uncertainties remain about the legality, quality, and safety of this new “miracle cure.” As a result, CBD is under scrutiny on many levels, ranging from national health organizations and agricultural lobbyists to the WHO and FDA. The central question is whether CBD is simply a food supplement, an investigational new medicine, or even a narcotic. This overview paper looks into the known risks and issues related to the composition of CBD products, and makes recommendations for better regulatory control based on accurate labeling and more scientifically supported health claims. The intention of this paper is to create a better understanding of the benefits versus the risks of the current way CBD products are produced, used, and advertised.
Can cannabis help treat psoriasis? The active cannabinoids in cannabis may be an effective treatment for psoriasis. Research shows that they offer potential health benefits that could relieve the symptoms of psoriasis. They may be able to reduce inflammation and itching, control pain, and even heal wounds. Learn more about cannabis for psoriasis here. Read now
Recently, an interesting study performed in the Netherlands highlighted multiple issues that may be extrapolated to CBD products elsewhere [51]. In this study, 46 different cannabis oil samples were collected directly from patients and analyzed for cannabinoid content. The obtained samples were home-made (n = 29) or purchased from a (web) store (n = 17). For 21 of the 46 products (46% of all samples), label information was available on CBD/THC content, so that the claimed content could be compared to the analyzed content as determined in the study. Results are shown in Table 1. In many cases the analyzed cannabinoid content strongly differed from the claimed content on the label, while in 7 samples no cannabinoids (CBD or THC) were found at all. Such deviations were found in home-made as well as commercially obtained products.
Over the last few years however I’ve seen more people taking a more active role in their care and treatment looking towards more alternative therapies and a more holistic approach to health which is ultimately in my view a very good thing. As much as western medicine has figured out there are still many things that they do not actually understand and just throwing more pills at the problem sometimes just makes things worse. Some of my close friends and even an employee that struggled with their IBS have had amazing success with making some dietary changes and finding the right cannabis based medication that worked for them.
Scientists have made a lot of progress in understanding how CBD produces its calming, pain-reducing, anti-inflammatory effects in the body—and there’s still more to learn. We know that CBD interacts with many different receptors, proteins, and other chemicals in the brain. These interactions create changes in the activity of neurotransmitters, hormones, and other cells throughout the brain and body. Through these interactions, CBD appears to be able to affect many of the body’s functions, from sleep-wake cycles and emotional regulation to inflammation, pain perception, and seizures.
CBD (Cannabidiol) is a naturally occurring compound found in the hemp plant (Cannabis Sativa). NuLeaf Naturals firmly believes that our organic CBD oil may improve the lives of individuals suffering from certain mental and physical ailments. The best of today’s science is on our side. A nonprofit called Project CBD has examined a wealth of peer-reviewed scientific research and concluded that cannabis oil may be therapeutic for individuals with conditions such as:
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