Last but not least, the starring ingredient. I have both variations (Olive Oil and Mint Chocolate) of Charlotte's Web, and I've used both in my coffee mixtures. The Olive Oil flavor is invisible among the mix-ins. When I first began making my CBD coffees at home, I started in baby steps, using just a few drops and eventually graduating to one full dropper. It's totally up to each individual, and while the packaging says one to three droppers per day is recommended, I've found my sweet spot to be just the morning single. I simply squeeze a full dropper into my blender with the rest of my ingredients, add a few ice cubes, and blend until smooth. I'm obsessed with the Mint Chocolate flavor and also add it to smoothies. As with anything you ingest, especially supplements, it's important to be careful with sourcing and to know what you're ingesting. I 100% trust Charlotte's Web for providing a healthy and safe product. Again, this is what has worked best for me, but if you're interested in trying CBD in your coffee (or any CBD product for that matter), doing your research and experimenting with what feels comfortable and tolerable to your body and its sensitivities is crucial. 
Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a natural phyto-cannabinoid (or plant-based chemical compound) found in cannabis plants, including hemp and marijuana. Unlike other cannabinoids — namely tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — CBD does not produce any psychoactive effects, and will actually counteract these effects to a degree. CBD will induce feelings of sleepiness; for this reason, it can be an effective soporific for people who struggle to fall and/or remain asleep due to insomnia and other sleep disorders.
Anyone who tells you anything definitive about what CBD — or THC, for that matter — does to your body is lying. Nobody knows. The legitimate research out there is extremely limited, and the slow drip of legalization — medical use, then personal use, federally illegal but permitted by certain states and cities — has made it incredibly hard for researchers to do their jobs.

Cannabis consumers have long prized potency (a high THC content) as one of the main factors that makes a particular strain more desirable. Though traditional demand for THC has caused an oversaturation of high-potency products, many consumers are starting to prefer less intense products that are lower in THC and higher in the non-intoxicating compound called cannabidiol (CBD).

A CNN program that featured Charlotte's Web cannabis in 2013 brought increased attention to the use of CBD in the treatment of seizure disorders.[68][69] Since then, 16 states have passed laws to allow the use of CBD products with a doctor's recommendation (instead of a prescription) for treatment of certain medical conditions.[70] This is in addition to the 30 states that have passed comprehensive medical cannabis laws, which allow for the use of cannabis products with no restrictions on THC content.[70] Of these 30 states, eight have legalized the use and sale of cannabis products without requirement for a doctor's recommendation.[70]

This is a whole new idea to me and I can use any help you can offer. I suffer from post stroke pain in my thigh which sounds similar to the pain diabetics feel in their feet (sort of electric shocks shooting through my skin). I’ve had this 24/7 for about 5 years now. The 600 mg Gabapentin 3 times a day is no longer helping. A friend just suggested marijuana topicals which I had never heard of! Any recommendations?


High-CBD strains can be smoked or vaporized for immediate effects with little to no high, depending on the strain’s THC content. A strain may contain only trace amounts of THC for clear-headed relief, or it may have balanced levels of THC and CBD, delivering a mild high but potent relief. Explore the menu of your nearby dispensary for a full list of the offerings near you, or browse high-CBD strains on Leafly for an idea of popular varieties to look out for.
There’s a growing body of scientific evidence to support the use of topical CBD products to ease pain, inflammation, and the symptoms of arthritis. One study using rats found that topical CBD has “therapeutic potential for relief of arthritis pain-related behaviours and inflammation without evident side-effects.” More scientific research on humans is needed to confirm all of CBD’s benefits, but the initial research into topical use in humans is also promising.

I suppose you could say that up until roughly a month ago, I hadn't given the CBD movement, as it pertains to the beauty and wellness industry, a fair shot. I had experimented here and there with balms, lotions, sprays, and under-the-tongue strips, but nothing stuck. I was intrigued, but I didn't experience anything miraculous. Therefore, I let my CBD product stash slip to the wayside. The one product I had strangely neglected? Cannabis oil. Which is weird considering oil-filled tinctures are one of the most popular ways to imbibe right now. Leave it to me to miss the train entirely only to arrive late to the party months later. Alas, I'm here now and ready to share my newest morning ritual: a CBD-infused elixir of happiness that irons out my nerves while allowing my much-needed coffee high to do its thing. Yep, squeezing CBD oil into my morning coffee has changed my life for the better. It's not surprising considering the plethora of research correlating the compound with decreased anxiety. Let me explain.


It is for this reason that all the finished hemp goods that you see for sale in America, from food products to clothing to building materials, are part of an imported hemp industry that has surpassed $688 million annually. The size of this import industry is one of the major catalysts for hemp legalization in the U.S. As a renewable source of a range of products, hemp provides an exciting new step in American agriculture.

Today, CBD is used for the treatment of a wide range of medical conditions. This started with the somewhat serendipitous discovery (by parents experimenting with self-medication for their children) that CBD had a therapeutic effect on a serious form of epilepsy in children, called Dravet syndrome [8]. This effect is now under clinical investigation with the pharmaceutical CBD product Epidiolex®, which is currently in phase 3 trials with encouraging results [9, 10]. The media attention generated by its effect on severely ill children gave CBD the push needed to become a much desired medicine almost overnight [11]. Other medical indications that may be treated with CBD, and are supported to some extent by clinical proof, include Parkinson’s disease [12], schizophrenia [13], and anxiety disorder [14]. However, although research into the therapeutic effects of CBD is rapidly increasing, most current uses of CBD are not (yet) supported by clinical data. The popular use of these products means that physicians may be confronted with the effects of CBD oil even when they do not prescribe it themselves.

The cannabis plant is filled with hundreds of different compounds, several of which have been studied for decades for their therapeutic benefits. The cannabis compounds that have captured the most scientific interest are known as cannabinoids. Cannabinoids are now used in treatment for a broad—and growing—range of conditions and symptoms, from sleep and pain, to anxiety and inflammation, to Parkinson’s disease and cancer.

CBD (Cannabidiol) is a naturally occurring compound found in the hemp plant (Cannabis Sativa). NuLeaf Naturals firmly believes that our organic CBD oil may improve the lives of individuals suffering from certain mental and physical ailments. The best of today’s science is on our side. A nonprofit called Project CBD has examined a wealth of peer-reviewed scientific research and concluded that cannabis oil may be therapeutic for individuals with conditions such as:
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