Ingredients: Helianthus annuus (Sunflower) Seed Oil, Stearic Acid (Vegetable Derived), Cetyl Alcohol (Coconut Alcohol), Sodium Hydroxide (non-GMO, mineral-salt), Citrus Grandis (Grapefruit) Seed Extract, Aloe barbadensis Leaf Juice, Ascorbic Acid (Vitamin C), Glycerin (non-GMO, vegetable-derived), Potassium Sorbate (non-GMO, mineral-salt), Xanthan Gum (non-GMO, vegetable-derived), Carthamus tinctorius (Safflower) Seed Oil*, Menthol (Mentha arvensis), Olea Europaea (Olive) Fruit Oil*, Ocimum basilicum (Basil) Leaf Oil*, Citrus aurantium bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil*, Whole Hemp Derived CBD Isolate, Montana (Arnica) Flower Oil, Melaleuca alternifolia (Tea Tree) Oil, Zingiber officinale (Ginger) Root Oil*, Citrus medica limonum (Lemon) Peel Oil*, Citrus aurantifolia (Lime) Peel Oil*, Citrus aurantium dulcis (Orange) Peel Oil*, Rosmarinus officinalis (Rosemary) Leaf Extract, Salvia sclarea (Clary) Oil*, Phenoxyethanol
...with due respect, your experience Locsta is almost precisely what happened with my....chihuahua. Degenerative disc disease, excruciating pain, prednisone worked, but couldn't keep her on it..pain killers and muscle relaxants didn't help, really thought I would have to put her down. Chi bloggers suggested CBD; gave PetReleaf a shot--like you, literally within minutes I could see the difference, in days she was pain free and now is back in charge of our world. The real key here is that with my dog, there is zero, nada, chance that there was any placebo effect...
In the last 6 months, I have been experimenting with CBD & THC to treat the aforementioned. It’s been an expensive experiment with some improvement, just not enough relief from the pain. I’m currently using 75 mcg of fentanyl transdermal, 30 mg Oxycodone 5x daily, muscle relaxers, arthritis pills, etc and they still don’t get me out of bed most days.
CBD products have become increasingly popular in recent years, as more and more producers market CBD as the new "it" drug for the health and wellness set — one that has been touted as a pain reliever and a treatment for anxiety, among other potential applications. Last year, consumer sales of CBD products topped $350 million in the United states, more than triple the amount sold in 2014, and various estimates predict the market could reach $2 billion within the next two to four years.
The only study that has tested the bioavailability of inhaled CBD is from 2014; it found a bioavailability of about 25 percent for 100 mg and 200 mg doses of CBD using a Volcano vaporizer. (The topical lotions are even less studied; there have been no clinical trials on them at all.) This is more efficient than ingesting CBD, in the same way that vaporizing THC is more efficient than eating it. To get an effect, you should ingest a different amount of CBD than you’d inhale ... but how much is that? How much is too much?
Scientists have made a lot of progress in understanding how CBD produces its calming, pain-reducing, anti-inflammatory effects in the body—and there’s still more to learn. We know that CBD interacts with many different receptors, proteins, and other chemicals in the brain. These interactions create changes in the activity of neurotransmitters, hormones, and other cells throughout the brain and body. Through these interactions, CBD appears to be able to affect many of the body’s functions, from sleep-wake cycles and emotional regulation to inflammation, pain perception, and seizures.

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