So far, I’ve found that in order to feel a marked improvement in pain relief, I need a high dose of CBD (which I have yet to determine due to the unavailability and expense). However, I have found that (edible) THC has allowed me to fall asleep faster and longer compared to prescriptions such as Ambian. It also gives me a feeling of well-being. I went from only sleeping 2-3 nights a week for no more than 4 hrs per sleep, to sleeping 8 hrs per night. This alone is worth using cannabis. As you know, lack of sleep can seriously impact your pain level.

Not only are we all made differently, we each have our own unique history with the use of substances, medications, supplements, and other things we put in our body. Because of this, we all have different body chemistry, and this will affect how our body reacts to CBD. As R.R Noall over at Herb puts it, “what works for your friend, may not work for you.”
For anyone still stumbling across this article…….try the Harlequin strain if you have access to it. It is close to the ideal 5:2 CBD:THC ratio that studies have shown to work synergistically together for maximum medicinal relief. Neither CBD nor THC is as powerful as the two are together, even though THC is getting thrown under the bus in some places as people try to “compromise” for CBD products in the legalization battle. CBD and THC are partners meant to work together.
The theoretical logic is there, Gerdeman says. What exactly is that thinking? Well, there are a few different ways CBD could help regulate pain—by increasing your natural endocannabinoids, decreasing your inflammatory response, and desensitizing your pain receptors (although it’s still unclear whether this stands when absorbed topically compared to orally).

The 2014 Farm Bill[74], legalized the sale of "non-viable hemp material" grown within states participating in the Hemp Pilot Program[75]. This legislation defined hemp as cannabis containing less than 0.3% of THC delta-9, grown within the regulatory framework of the Hemp Pilot Program. This has led many to insist that CBD manufactured from hemp, is legal in all 50 states and exempts its oversight by the DEA as a controlled substance[76]. The 2018 Farm Bill is anticipated to provide further clarity regarding hemp regulations[77].


Ingredients: Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe Vera) Leaf Juice*, Purified Water, Carthamus Tinctorius (Safflower) Oleosomes, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shae) Butter*, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil*, Vegetable Glycerin**, Cetearyl Olivate, Sorbitan Olivate**, Mangifera Indica (Mango) Seed Butter*, Lactobacillus Ferment (from Cabbage)**, Lactobacillus, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Fruit Extract**, CW Hemp Oil CO2 Extract, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Leaf Extract, Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Curcuma Longa (Turmeric) Root Extract, Salix Alba (Willow) Bark Extract, Cimicifuga Racemosa (Black Cohash) Root Extract, Prunus Armeniaca (Apricot) Kernel Oil*, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil*, Glyceryl Stearate (Palm Oil Derived), Xanthan Gum, Panthenol (Vitamin B5), Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Cyamopsis Tetragonolobus (Guar) Gum*, Sodium Benzoate, and Potassium Sorbate.

The term "CBD" is a nickname for cannabidiol, which is one of several cannabinoids, or chemical compounds, that are found in cannabis and hemp plants. Of course, the most famous cannabinoid is tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC, which is the main psychoactive component in marijuana (aka, the part that gets you high). Because CBD is not psychoactive, it does not create the same buzzy effects typically associated with marijuana when ingested.
Users speak of a “body” high, as opposed to a mind-altering one. “Physically, it’s like taking a warm bath, melting the tension away,” said Gabe Kennedy, 27, a founder of Plant People, a start-up in New York that sells CBD capsules and oils. “It is balancing; a leveling, smoothing sensation in the body mostly, and an evenness of attention in the mind.”
CBD does not appear to have any psychotropic ("high") effects such as those caused by ∆9-THC in marijuana, but may have anti-anxiety and anti-psychotic effects.[10] As the legal landscape and understanding about the differences in medical cannabinoids unfolds, it will be increasingly important to distinguish "medical marijuana" (with varying degrees of psychotropic effects and deficits in executive function) – from "medical CBD therapies” which would commonly present as having a reduced or non-psychoactive side effect profile.[10][60]
Like many of my fellow New York City residents, I’ve recently grown aware of the presence of CBD in my surroundings. In particular, CBD at coffee shops. It started when some friends of mine were discussing a pilgrimage out to Flower Power Coffee Co., known for its “artisanal CBD-infused coffee.” Then, at a fancy matcha cart I went to for Instagram-related purposes, I noticed that alongside health food add-ins like oat milk was the option to include a one-dollar shot of CBD. I didn’t do it, because weed in most forms tends to make me sleepy and it was 1 p.m. on a Saturday in the middle of Brooklyn's trendiest neighborhood.
Though a CBD latte might not do much for you — at least not beyond what caffeine and the placebo effect combined can do, which isn’t nothing — it’s also probably harmless in most cases, says Carson, and may even have positive benefits we aren’t yet aware of. “I suspect there’s probably some antioxidant benefit to CBD like there is with coffee,” says Carson. “There’s tons of good things in coffee that we still don’t fully understand, and I think the marijuana plant is much the same way.”

CBD Topical Lotions

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