What makes CBD so appealing is that it’s non-intoxicating, so it won’t get you high, though it “is technically psychoactive, because it can influence things like anxiety,” Jikomes said. Although much of the marketing blitz around CBD centers on the fact that you can take it without getting stoned, there isn’t much research looking at the effects of CBD when used in isolation, with a couple of exceptions. One is the use of CBD to treat seizures: CBD is the active ingredient in the only cannabis product that the Food and Drug Administration has signed off on — a drug called Epidiolex, which is approved for treating two rare forms of epilepsy. Animal models and a few human studies suggest that CBD can help with anxiety, but those are the only conditions with much research on CBD in isolation.
Cannabinoids are a class of compounds that interact with receptors throughout your body. CBD is just one of dozens of cannabinoids found in cannabis, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the one responsible for marijuana’s famous high. Medical cannabis is technically any cannabis product used for medicinal purposes, and these can contain THC or CBD or both, said Nick Jikomes, a neuroscientist at Leafly, a website that provides information about legal cannabis. “A common mistake people make is to think that CBD is ‘the medical cannabinoid’ and THC is ‘the recreational cannabinoid.’” That’s inaccurate, he said, because THC is a potent anti-inflammatory and can be helpful for pain.
According to West, who says her team is “drawing on a wealth of anecdotal evidence,” CBD in your java can really take the edge off. “My colleagues, friends, and I have found that CBD-infused coffee largely does away with the anxiety and acid belly typically associated with coffee,” she says. “That makes sense, because research suggests CBD has anti-anxiety and [anti-nausea] effects. We’ve also found that compared to the coffee we reach for regularly, testers experience a less jittery, elevated burst of energy after drinking CBD-infused coffee.”
Every field of interest comes with its own terminology. In the world of CBD, it can seem like there are many terms that are being thrown out there, such as CBD oil, hemp oil, THC oil, cannabis oil, and marijuana oil. With the vast amount of information being introduced, it is easy to confuse one term from the next. We have received numerous questions in regards to the difference between all of these terms.
The 2016 European Journal of Pain conducted a study on rat models to test the effectiveness of CBD against arthritis in order to see if it could serve as an all-natural alternative to the typical arthritis pain medications, which are often tied with numerous uncomfortable and frustrating side effects. The rats were treated for 4 days with 4 different doses of CBD gel, and the results were quite staggering.
Further explanation is in order. The difference between psychoactive cannabis (“marijuana,” by the increasingly disfavored traditional term) and hemp is a question of THC content — and legal classification. The federal government defines hemp as cannabis with 0.3 percent THC or less in terms of dry weight. The 2014 federal Farm Bill legalized state pilot programs for hemp, and 40 of the 50 states now have defined industrial hemp as distinct from cannabis and removed barriers to its production — including California. However, California’s hemp pilot program is overseen by the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) — not either the CDPH or Bureau of Cannabis Control.

Still, CBD is already commonly used to relieve some symptoms of anxiety, including insomnia, and there have been some studies that show it to be effective in those cases. Other studies have shown that CBD could have anti-inflammatory properties, and many CBD products are marketed for relieving chronic pain, such as arthritis. And multiple studies have found CBD to be an effective treatment for seizures, and there are various CBD products that are used by patients with epilepsy. However, major health agencies like the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health and the World Health Organization have all stated in recent years that additional CBD testing and research is necessary.
Sativex, an oral spray containing both CBD and THC, can treat MS-induced pain. During one study, researchers gave Sativex to 47 participants with MS. Results were largely positive. Patients who used this spray felt notably better. Their muscle and walking spasms decreased, and they felt pain relief. Thanks to studies such as this one, several countries approved using Sativex in MS treatment.
An important factor is the quality and purity of our CBD. We chose the Kentucky farm collective because of the quality of the hemp plants being grown under the Federal Farm Bill and in conjunction with the Kentucky Agricultural Department Hemp Pilot Program. There are very specific guidelines for planting, growing and the processing of the CBD isolate. As a result, the quality of the CBD produced from the whole plant is some of the purest available. We take great pride in providing our clients with an extremely pure, clean and high-quality product to those who desire CBD. Each and every product that leaves the facility is third-party tested to ensure consistency and quality.
Among beauty products alone, CBD has already achieved cliché status, popping up in blemish creams, sleeping masks, shampoos, hair conditioners, eye serums, anti-acne lotions, mascaras, massage oils, soaps, lip balms, bath bombs, anti-wrinkle serums, muscle rubs and a Sephora aisle’s worth of moisturizers, face lotions and body creams. Even the bedroom is not safe from the CBD invasion, to judge by the spate of CBD sexual lubricants on shelves.

CBD or Cannabidiol, is the non-psychoactive compound found in the cannabis sativa plant (Industrial Hemp). For many, the health benefits of adding CBD to their diet results in positive effects to the body’s endocannabinoid system – the vast network of CB1 and CB2 receptors and other receptors within the body and system found naturally found in the human body.
Tinctures are liquid cannabis extractions that are applied under the tongue. Soaked in either alcohol or vegetable glycerin, cannabis tinctures were among the earliest forms of cannabis medicines prior to its prohibition in the United States. They tend to be less concentrated than other oil extracts, but their effects kick in faster than ingestible oils and edibles.
…..i have an aggressive form of heart disease (atherosclerosis) and my on-line research into medical marijuana has uncovered that there are 2 main forms of canabidiol, CBD 1 and CBD 2. Current research is indicating that CBD 1 promotes the growth of arterial plaque while CBD 2 inhibits this growth. Thus, I would like to use a strain that is high in THC and high in CBD 2 with no CBD 1. Is there anything out there with this combination (THC/CBD2) ?? Thanks !!
The next morning, I blended the contents of the bottle up with collagen (because I add Vital Proteins to pretty much everything I drink) and took my first sip. I was immediately impressed with the taste—so creamy, dreamy, delicious, and not at all skunky. Settling into my couch with my laptop (lazy Sunday mornings are when I like to get myself organized for the upcoming work week), I continued to sip. Normally, and as it would for anyone, diving into my inbox, scanning the upcoming week's calendar, and plotting out all my upcoming to-dos sends shivers of nerves and anxiety down my spine. I love my job, but it comes with its fair share of stress. Miraculously, however, I felt calm, cool, and collected. As my fingers skipped away at lightning speed on my keyboard courtesy of that 80 milligrams of caffeine, I didn't have the usual side effect of nerves, jumps, or jitters. I felt good, and on my way home from the gym later that day, I picked up a couple more bottles of Kickback. What can I say? I was high for it. Of course, "high" not to be taken literally, as CBD—aka cannabidiol—is a non-psychoactive compound of cannabis.
Inhibited liver function: The liver regulates the way different drugs are metabolized within the body; this process is known as hepatic drug metabolism. Higher-than-average doses of CBD oil can slow the hepatic drug metabolism process. As a result, users may not be able to process other drugs as quickly. This is particularly concerning for CBD oil users who also take prescription medications.
CBD E-Liquid/Vape Cartridges: Vaping is excellent for people looking for an immediate response, as inhalation is the fastest way to deliver CBDs to your brain and body. To use vape simply exhale gently the air from your lungs then inhale through the mouthpiece slowly for 3 seconds. Then fill your lungs the rest of the way with additional breath and hold for a few seconds, exhaling when ready. There are pre-filled, cost-effective vape pens and cartridges available as well as more expensive vaporizers that you can refill with CBD-infused e-liquid.

Meanwhile, so-called wellness drinks infused with CBD are gaining traction. The UK’s first has been launched by Botanic Lab, promoted as “Dutch courage with a difference”. Drinks giants Coca-Cola, Molson Coors Brewing Company and Diageo are all considering launching their own versions, while UK craft breweries such as Green Times Brewing (formerly Cloud 9 Brewing) and Stockton Brewing Company are offering cannabis-oil laced beers, and mixologists are spiking their cocktails with CBD mellowness. The fancy marshmallow maker, The Marshmallowist, has added CBD-oil flavour to its menu, promising that “you feel the effects immediately upon eating”, without specifying what those effects might be.


“We’ve found that an effective dose for psychological issues, like stress anxiety, generally tends to start out at 6 mg and can go up to 20 mg,” says Zachary Clancy, a horticulturist and clinical herbalist at the Alchemist’s Kitchen, which sells a wide range of CBD goods at its retail store in lower Manhattan and also sells wholesale to restaurants. (Clinical herbalists can complete any of a variety of educational programs and apprenticeships to gain that title.)


A few weeks ago, in a bike shop–slash–coffee shop in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, I saw a little sign for a new product on offer: a CBD lavender latte. I didn’t get one, in part because it was 80 degrees outside, and also because my experiences with CBD are somewhat mixed. I have some gummy fruit candy that puts me straight to sleep, and I found using an oil dropper on my tongue too disgusting-tasting to be worth whatever marginal benefits it may have given me. But I knew other anxious people have had good experiences with CBD, and I like coffee, so I was interested — though I did wonder if coffee (a stimulant) and CBD (a cannabinoid thought to have relaxing properties) might just cancel each other out.
However (and this is very important), as has typically been the case with legal marijuana, the federal government mostly looks the other way while individual states decide how to treat CBD. As such, most states allow CBD products in some form, usually for medical purposes. The 30 states that have legalized medical marijuana include CBD products in that protection, while a number of other states have specific CBD laws that allow for those products in some form, so long as they also contain no more than a miniscule amount of THC. Only four states consider all cannabis-derived products, including CBD, to be illegal: Idaho, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas.
CBD, one of the more than 100 chemicals in cannabis, is emerging as a popular wellness ingredient. The plant extract, often consumed as an oil under the tongue, is now the featured ingredient in high-end products including coconut oil, body lotion, face serum, olive oil, jam, bath scrub, cold-brew coffee, sports salve, lip balm, infused water, gummy snacks and dog treats. Products' prices vary but may cost about triple what their CBD-less counterparts do.
Scientists have made a lot of progress in understanding how CBD produces its calming, pain-reducing, anti-inflammatory effects in the body—and there’s still more to learn. We know that CBD interacts with many different receptors, proteins, and other chemicals in the brain. These interactions create changes in the activity of neurotransmitters, hormones, and other cells throughout the brain and body. Through these interactions, CBD appears to be able to affect many of the body’s functions, from sleep-wake cycles and emotional regulation to inflammation, pain perception, and seizures.

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