Though clinical and anecdotal evidence suggests CBD’s benefits in managing different conditions, it became most famous for treating a rare and debilitating form of pediatric epilepsy. Dravet’s Syndrome is notoriously resistant to current approved treatment methods. Sufferers are plagued by seizures, often up to hundreds a day, that worsen as they age and can be life-threatening. Currently, treatment methods include having the child wear an eyepatch, specialized diets, and brain surgery, but all have mixed success rates.


While the CBD latte dosage varies from coffee shop to coffee shop, the range seems to fall between two to 15 drops, or approximately 20 to 30 milligrams, says Blessing. That’s a lot less than what’s been shown to work in clinical trials for various conditions, which makes Blessing skeptical that a CBD latte could produce any noticeable effect. “There’s no evidence whatsoever that a small amount of CBD is actually doing anything at all,” she says. “An analogy I give sometimes is, you wouldn’t take 2 mg of ibuprofen. It doesn’t do anything.”
Among beauty products alone, CBD has already achieved cliché status, popping up in blemish creams, sleeping masks, shampoos, hair conditioners, eye serums, anti-acne lotions, mascaras, massage oils, soaps, lip balms, bath bombs, anti-wrinkle serums, muscle rubs and a Sephora aisle’s worth of moisturizers, face lotions and body creams. Even the bedroom is not safe from the CBD invasion, to judge by the spate of CBD sexual lubricants on shelves.
This mint-green bath bomb, made by Los Angeles-based De La Beuh, combines the invigorating aromatherapy of peppermint oil with the pain relief benefits of CBD. I sat in the bath with this bath bomb soak for an hour—until the water ran cold—when I had both cramps and lower back aches, and while it doesn’t beat ingesting a painkiller, it did help soothe my pains so that I fell asleep as soon as I hit the pillow. De La Beuh sells bath bombs in many varieties—including a glittery Kaleidoscope version that will turn your bath into “unicorn” colors—so your preference just depends on your preferred aroma.
CBD, or canabidiol is an amazingly useful plant compound that is extracted from the cannabis plant. With volumes of medical science now at its back, this compound has been used effectively for a wide range of needs. These particularly wide-ranging applications are the result of its being a part of the “pleiotropic sedate” group. Compounds in this group are especially unique in their ability to affect and travel along many of the typically closed atomic pathways.

I have been suffering from scalp pain, itching and scalp sores for more than 3 years. I have seen 6 dermatologists and 5 diagnosed me with folliculitis. The 6th dermatologist felt I did not have folliculitis, but dysesthesia. I am interested in trying a cannabis scalp cream, but know nothing about this product, and where I might get it, and if it might work for me. I have had 7/7 pain for 3.5 years and need some relief other than narcotics.
Oh, was I just talking about Girl Scout cookies? I prefer showers over baths—we all have an allegiance to one or the other—but we can’t ignore how many memes have come out of #bathbombs. It’s satisfying to watch them fizzle, they turn your bath into fun colors, and they claim to provide aromatherapy benefits, too. They’re also much tidier than traditional bath salt products; just chuck one in and wait!
My mom is late stage dementia. We have tried coconut oil/black pepper/curcumin combo for years. Gives only tine bit of help, and is not something that reverses dementia. Maybe in someone who can score better than a 14 on the mme it could be of help. But cannabinoid is a different story. Cannabinoids produce better results in less time. Can't say yet that they will reverse anything though.

The few CBD studies out there give us limited information, and hardly any about recreational CBD use. One study gave people different amounts of ingested CBD (100, 300, and 900 mg), as well as, for comparison, a placebo and Klonopin; those people then had to give a public speech, an action associated with high levels of anxiety in the broad populace. Neither 100 mg nor 900 mg, nor the placebo, had any effect. The 300 mg dose, though, did have a measurable calming effect on heart rate, blood pressure, and anxiety. (The Klonopin also worked.)


It’s not about quality, either; even the finest CBD-infused coffee won’t change the mind of substance purists like myself. Let’s say you’re drinking CBD coffee to relax—hey, that’s great… but that caffeine isn’t going anywhere. In fact, the only feasible situation CBD coffee would work would be if the coffee in question was decaffeinated… but we all know that only dads drink decaf. CBD coffee is the culmination of two great things Frankenstein’d together to make one mediocre product, like Julian Lennon or those shoes that look like socks.


Larilyn, Great question. Most CBD oils are hemp-derived, which, by definition, means they generally contain 0.3 percent THC. That being said, there is no way to guarantee that a person will pass a UA screening due to variables within that persons composition & other influences. Some people will turn to a isolate version zero percent THC of CBD for this reason but in doing so will not reap the benefits of full spectrum. I prefer the option of Enterouge oil for these candidates.
Of course, there are many different treatments for both anxiety and depression. However, they have a lot of side effects. These include agitation, drowsiness, insomnia, headaches, and sexual dysfunction. In addition, certain prescription drugs can be very addictive, like BZDs. In fact, they can be more addictive than hard drugs such as crack cocaine or heroin.
However (and this is very important), as has typically been the case with legal marijuana, the federal government mostly looks the other way while individual states decide how to treat CBD. As such, most states allow CBD products in some form, usually for medical purposes. The 30 states that have legalized medical marijuana include CBD products in that protection, while a number of other states have specific CBD laws that allow for those products in some form, so long as they also contain no more than a miniscule amount of THC. Only four states consider all cannabis-derived products, including CBD, to be illegal: Idaho, South Dakota, Nebraska and Kansas.
Then there’s the issue of vomiting and nausea after chemotherapy. Most people that underwent chemo know that there is proper medication for these side effects. However, these meds often don’t achieve the desired effect. It’s no wonder that people are looking for alternatives like CBD. During one study, 16 participants that had chemo treatment used a CBD-THC combination. This combo was administered through a spray. Nearly all participants agreed that this helped lower vomiting and nausea.
Then there’s the issue of vomiting and nausea after chemotherapy. Most people that underwent chemo know that there is proper medication for these side effects. However, these meds often don’t achieve the desired effect. It’s no wonder that people are looking for alternatives like CBD. During one study, 16 participants that had chemo treatment used a CBD-THC combination. This combo was administered through a spray. Nearly all participants agreed that this helped lower vomiting and nausea.

Research on low levels of CBD is, you guessed it, incredibly limited; just a single paper on the medical research database PubMed specifically looked at CBD in these low doses, as a treatment for Crohn’s disease. (It was not found to have an effect.) As such, it wouldn’t be fair to say that 5 or even 20 mg of CBD oil in your coffee is proven to do nothing; that hasn’t been proven. It’s more accurate to say that 20 mg of CBD oil in your coffee has never been proven to do much of anything, and related research indicates that’s probably way too low of a dose to have any measurable effect.
I’ve been hoarding Girl Scouts Thin Mints lately (they’re especially good if you freeze them)—the chocolate is fine, but the peppermint oil is what makes them addicting enough to go through a whole sleeve without getting sick of them. I’m also trying to cut down on sugar, though, and while it would be a huge stretch to say that this peppermint oil-infused clear lip balm is a direct replacement for Girl Scout cookies, it really does have a very satisfying full-mouth taste of peppermint. The CBD oil, which soothes and facilitates healing at the same time, makes this formula an ideal balm for outdoor enthusiasts and or just those who are prone to painfully chapped lips. For those of us with long-hair-don’t-care, it’s not sticky—as a matter of fact, the formula is on the stiff side and won’t cause your hair to stick to your face, a welcome departure from many balms.
Hemp Extract Oil* and Hemp Oil are from a different Cannabis plant called Cannabis Sativa.  Hemp Extract is made from the entire plant including leaf, seed and stem.  Most oils on the market selling as C B D oil are 97% or more Hemp Seed Oil, mct oil or vegetable glycerine and 3% Hemp Extract. This does not contain THC and is legal in all 50 states.
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