Interestingly, the memo argues that while California is willing to challenge the federal government’s authority when it comes to legalizing cannabis, it’s not willing to challenge the federal government when it comes to hemp. The memo states: “Although California currently allows the manufacturing and sales of cannabis products (including edibles), the use of industrial hemp as the source of CBD to be added to food products is prohibited. Until the FDA rules that industrial hemp-derived CBD oil and CBD products can be used as a food or California makes a determination that they are safe to use for human and animal consumption, CBD products are not an approved food, food ingredient, food additive, or dietary supplement.”

Cannabis oils may contain various concentrations of CBD, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and minor cannabinoids, mainly depending on the cannabis variety used for extraction. The most popular product currently is CBD oil, but for example cannabigerol (CBG)-rich oil has been spotted as well [2], and others will very likely follow soon. The THC-rich type of cannabis oil has already been known for some years, and is generally known under the name “Simpson oil” [3]. Terpenes may or may not be present in these products, depending on the preparation method used [4]. Because they are highly volatile, elevated temperatures (such as those applied during drying of plant materials, or during the evaporation of solvents) may result in a significant loss of terpene components [5]. However, it is possible to capture evaporated terpenes by condensation, and reintroduce them back into the final oil. Additional ingredients may be added to further adjust properties such as color, viscosity, taste, or shelf-life stability.
CA already has its hands full (poorly) implementing it’s legal marijuana laws, it’s doubtful whether there is time, money or political willingness to go into retail stores and remove a product that’s federally legal to sell and own based on the Hemp Farm Act of 2014. It’s also poorly written (as referenced in the article). I agree with the poster that this has to be politically or financially driven.
It is well known that cannabis plants obtained from uncontrolled sources may be contaminated with various harmful substances [39], sometimes leading to severe health issues or hospitalization [40]. Contaminants include chemicals that were intentionally added in order to increase yield, weight, or potency (e.g., pesticides, metal particles [41], synthetic cannabinoids [42]) but also agents that entered the plant unintentionally (e.g., heavy metals, molds and bacteria [43], aflatoxins). For example, pesticides are frequently present in cannabis sold by Dutch coffee shops [44], but were also found in cannabis offered under state law in California [45] as well as medicinal cannabis from licensed producers in Canada [46]. If any of these contaminants were present in hemp used for CBD extraction, they would likely end up in a concentrated form in the final oil. One contaminant specifically relevant to cannabis (CBD or THC) oils is the residual presence of toxic solvents used during the extraction procedure [3].
New methods of cannabis consumption are bringing us further away from the notion that marijuana belongs solely in a bong or joint – or that it has to get you high, for that matter. Cannabis-infused topicals are an example of how new modes of consumption are revolutionizing perceptions of marijuana as their accessibility, safety, and efficacy invite even the most unlikely patrons into the world of medical cannabis.

So is it possible that despite all this anecdotal evidence, low-dose CBD is a placebo? Sure, because, say it with me: We don’t know anything about CBD. “Unfortunately,” says Baron, “we are nowhere near close to having any definitive trials on effectiveness for most symptoms claimed to benefit from CBD with trials that are scientifically relevant, such as prospective randomized placebo-controlled trials.”
But, uh, what is it that CBD is supposed to do? I visited a cannabis dispensary in Boulder to find out what the hype was all about. After passing an ID check, I was introduced to a “budtender” who pointed me to an impressive array of CBD products — tinctures, skin patches, drink powders, candies, salves, massage oil, lotions, “sexy time personal intimacy oil” and even vaginal suppositories to treat menstrual cramps.
When you mix the benefits of coffee and the benefits of CBD oil, you get an incredible morning regime that is good for your whole body! It really is a match made in heaven. Although coffee has many benefits, the caffeine can increase stress hormones called cortisol. However, CBD oil can cause drowsiness in some people. Therefore, when you combine the two to create CBD coffee, you get the best of both worlds.
Hemp pertains to a strain of Cannabis Sativa that has been bred precisely for oils and topical ointments, fiber used for clothing and construction, nutritional benefits, and a broad thriving variety of other purposes that do not involve the euphoria that is associated with marijuana. Hemp is a fast growing plant and was one of the first plants to be spun into usable fiber more than 10,000 years ago.
All material provided within this website is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not to be construed as medical advice or instruction. No action should be taken solely on the contents of this website. Consult your physician or a qualified health professional on any matters regarding your health and well-being or on any opinions expressed within this website. The information provided in our newsletters and special reports is believed to be accurate based on the best judgement of the Company and the authors. However, the reader is responsible for consulting with their own health professional on any matters raised within. Neither the company nor the author's of any information provided accept responsibility for the actions or consequential results of any action taken by any reader.
We are committed to bringing our customers the highest-grade organic cannabis oil products on the market. Our CBD oil is derived from organic hemp plants and is legal in all 50 states. We proudly call ourselves NuLeaf “Naturals” because our cannabis oils are 100% organic, free of additives and preservatives. Every bottle of cannabis oil we provide to our customers has been subjected to rigorous laboratory testing to ensure that it contains the optimal amount of CBD.
×