Topicals are cannabis-infused lotions, balms, and oils that are absorbed through the skin for localized relief of pain, soreness, and inflammation. Because they’re non-intoxicating, topicals are often chosen by patients who want the therapeutic benefits of marijuana without the cerebral euphoria associated with other delivery methods. Other transdermal innovations are fast arriving in the cannabis market, including long-lasting patches and tingly lubricants for patients and recreational consumers alike.
They may be safe, but there's one massive problem: There's practically no scientific data to support the idea that a CBD-infused topical cream is any more effective than other topical pain relievers, like Tiger Balm, BenGay, or Icy Hot. Michelle Sexton, a San Diego-based naturopathic doctor and medical research director of the Center for the Study of Cannabis and Social Policy says that her patients do seem to have a great interest in CBD ointments, and roughly 40 percent of them have indeed tried one. However, these people are in her office now because the topicals didn’t work for them. "As a medical professional, my opinion is there’s little evidence to back up the claims being made—it’s all marketing for now," she says.

CBD products have become increasingly popular in recent years, as more and more producers market CBD as the new "it" drug for the health and wellness set — one that has been touted as a pain reliever and a treatment for anxiety, among other potential applications. Last year, consumer sales of CBD products topped $350 million in the United states, more than triple the amount sold in 2014, and various estimates predict the market could reach $2 billion within the next two to four years.


I tried a high CBD caplet with no THC. Unfortunately, I found it to be ineffective as a sleep aid, although it eases my chronic pain. Therefore, I take it when I arise for the day. I found an over-the-counter (Washington State) tincture called “beauty sleep” is working for me as a sleep aid. It costs me about $3.00 per night. It tastes yucky, but it works. I put two droppers full of the tincture under my tongue and keep it there for as long as I can before swallowing it. I am able to sleep about 7 hours per night with only one interruption to use the bathroom. This tincture contains 57% THC, which I was trying to avoid, but it is worth it. I do not use it to fall asleep, but to stay asleep. I wait to take it until I am really sleepy. It takes about 90 minutes for it to take effect, which is when I am already sleeping. Without it, that is about when I would be waking up and not being able to get back to sleep. If I take it before I am really sleepy, it just gives me the munchies and I do not need the extra calories. I feel kind of stoned when I wake up to pee, but I get back to sleep a lot better than I did before I started using the tincture. I have not built up a tolerance to it (so far) which is a concern because I do not want to be needing increasingly more as time goes by.. I have been using it for about four months now and am hopeful that it will continue to be effective without needing to increase the dosage. Maybe BEAUTY SLEEP will work for you. It sure has improved my quality of life. Now I am not so narcoleptic and low-energy during the day. Good luck finding a solution to your sleep issues.
I used it on my mother's feet (she's 90). She is great for testing anything because she's in an incredible amount of pain and absolutely NOTHING works for her. Two hours after I applied it, she came into my room and said, "I can't believe that cream actually worked. I still don't have any pain in my toes and the bottom of my feet. It worked so well, I forgot about the pain after you put it on..." Needless to say, she looks forward to an application every evening.
Research suggests that CBD may exert some of its pharmacological action through its inhibition of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), which may in turn increase the levels of endocannabinoids, such as anandamide, produced by the body.[8] It has also been speculated that some of the metabolites of CBD have pharmacological effects that contribute to the biological activity of CBD.[42]
We live in partisan times, as anyone who had to sit through Thanksgiving dinner with distant relatives can probably attest. But even your crazy uncle would agree that the safety of our food shouldn't be a partisan issue. No one wants their child to get sick from eating a hamburger, chicken, or—in the case of the current E. coli outbreak—romaine lettuce. Yet last week's empty Thanksgiving salad bowls are a harbinger of what's to come if our federal government does not start taking food safety seriously.
Can cannabis help treat psoriasis? The active cannabinoids in cannabis may be an effective treatment for psoriasis. Research shows that they offer potential health benefits that could relieve the symptoms of psoriasis. They may be able to reduce inflammation and itching, control pain, and even heal wounds. Learn more about cannabis for psoriasis here. Read now
Despite this, CBD is something nobody knows much about, and certainly nobody is monitoring it properly. CBD is widely marketed as a supplement, despite the Food and Drug Administration saying it does not qualify as such (this is because it is an active ingredient in drugs which are either approved or under investigation to be approved). CBD goes largely unregulated by the agency; on the FDA’s FAQ page, a vague answer maintains there are “many factors in deciding whether or not to initiate an enforcement action.” The Department of Agriculture handles research grants and pilot programs for hemp, but that’s where its involvement ends.
Cannabidiol is insoluble in water but soluble in organic solvents such as pentane. At room temperature, it is a colorless crystalline solid.[44] In strongly basic media and the presence of air, it is oxidized to a quinone.[45] Under acidic conditions it cyclizes to THC,[46] which also occurs during pyrolysis (smoking).[47] The synthesis of cannabidiol has been accomplished by several research groups.[48][49][50]
Scientists have made a lot of progress in understanding how CBD produces its calming, pain-reducing, anti-inflammatory effects in the body—and there’s still more to learn. We know that CBD interacts with many different receptors, proteins, and other chemicals in the brain. These interactions create changes in the activity of neurotransmitters, hormones, and other cells throughout the brain and body. Through these interactions, CBD appears to be able to affect many of the body’s functions, from sleep-wake cycles and emotional regulation to inflammation, pain perception, and seizures.

Cannabis CBD Topical Products

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