Liquid CBD Oil/Tinctures/Extracts: Drops or tinctures should have a “suggested serving size” and the total milligrams of CBD listed on their packaging. From there, you can determine the amount of CBD you would like to ingest. Simply place the correct quantity of drops under your tongue using the dropper and hold the CBD oil in place for a minimum of 60 seconds. The 60 second hold allows for absorption via the blood vessels underneath your tongue – efficiently bypassing first-pass metabolism. Once 60 seconds has passed, swallow the CBD oil.
Cannabidiol has been found to act as an antagonist of GPR55, a G protein-coupled receptor and putative cannabinoid receptor that is expressed in the caudate nucleus and putamen in the brain.[34] It has also been found to act as an inverse agonist of GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12.[12] Although currently classified as orphan receptors, these receptors are most closely related phylogenetically to the cannabinoid receptors.[12] In addition to orphan receptors, CBD has been shown to act as a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist,[35] and this action may be involved in its antidepressant,[36][37] anxiolytic,[37][38] and neuroprotective effects.[39][40] It is an allosteric modulator of the μ- and δ-opioid receptors as well.[41] The pharmacological effects of CBD have additionally been attributed to PPARγ agonism and intracellular calcium release.[8]

Look up Chris Shade (quicksilver scientific) on YouTube, specifically a webinar entitled ‘Cannabidiol: The Full Story pt.2’. He is a brilliant biochemist who has been studying the biochemical effects of cannabidiol. He says that CBD has the potential to be more therapeutic than THC as it up-regulates/down-regulates gene expression in over 400 genes each way (up and down). A great balancer and extremely helpful in treating Lyme, more specifically allowing for more aggressive detoxification of the Lyme and co-infections. There is also considerably symbiosis with heavy metals, molds, EMF’s, etc. so you must also address those aspects. It’s supremely complex and even most Lyme literate docs don’t deal with all aspects. Antibiotics are often counterproductive with persistent Lyme as the spirochetes protect themselves with a biofilm that must be broken down (Interfase Plus). Protocols must be comprehensive in order to make progress. If you have not checked your CD57, do that. It’s a marker for natural killer cells commonly associated with Lyme (a simplistic explanation). The reference range is 100-300. First time I had it checked 2 years ago, it was 48. Despite modest attempts to boost my CD57 with some of the Nutramedix products, I only got 6-7 point increase per year. In April of this year, I got more aggressive with a homeopathic regimen, taking a variety of the Cowden (Nutramedix), Buhner and other products. The next time I checked CD57, two months later, it jumped 70 points… remarkable by any measure. My western blot also went from 2 bands to 5 bands as my body as finally able to mount an antibody response. I can’t say for sure which products had the biggest impact, but if I had to guess, it would be the Biocidin LSF (liposomal) and perhaps DesBio Lyme Plus. But I was also taking Samento, Burbur, Cumanda, resveratrol, glutathione, phosphatidylcholine, NanoMojo, and a variety of other things and a good supplement regimen. There is no one product answer. Cannabinoids can help with the symptoms and support a more aggressive regimen, but addressing the Lyme must be a multi-faceted effort. Be very wary of pulsed antibiotic protocols with doxycycline. It’s not out of the question, but decimating your microbiome is counterproductive.

Though a CBD latte might not do much for you — at least not beyond what caffeine and the placebo effect combined can do, which isn’t nothing — it’s also probably harmless in most cases, says Carson, and may even have positive benefits we aren’t yet aware of. “I suspect there’s probably some antioxidant benefit to CBD like there is with coffee,” says Carson. “There’s tons of good things in coffee that we still don’t fully understand, and I think the marijuana plant is much the same way.”
Cannabis oils may contain various concentrations of CBD, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and minor cannabinoids, mainly depending on the cannabis variety used for extraction. The most popular product currently is CBD oil, but for example cannabigerol (CBG)-rich oil has been spotted as well [2], and others will very likely follow soon. The THC-rich type of cannabis oil has already been known for some years, and is generally known under the name “Simpson oil” [3]. Terpenes may or may not be present in these products, depending on the preparation method used [4]. Because they are highly volatile, elevated temperatures (such as those applied during drying of plant materials, or during the evaporation of solvents) may result in a significant loss of terpene components [5]. However, it is possible to capture evaporated terpenes by condensation, and reintroduce them back into the final oil. Additional ingredients may be added to further adjust properties such as color, viscosity, taste, or shelf-life stability.
Given the degree to which marijuana and cannabinoid derivative use has been stigmatized in the past, their Schedule I classification as illegal substances, and lack of FDA approval, valid medical research on the effects of CBD isn’t as plentiful as it should be. Much of the anecdotal evidence, however, suggests that CBD’s neuro- protective, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory effects with regard to topical applications are promising.2
CBD is short for cannabidiol, and it is one of more than 60 compounds found in these plants.  It acts on the body’s endocannabinoid system, creating physical changes in the body, which can be beneficial in many ways.  In recent times, it has become increasingly understood that taking CBD oil, a product made from CBD, can have a positive influence on many aspects of life and health.

For pain management, both topical and oral CBD work well, typically proving the most effective relief when utilized together. Oral CBD also assists in the diminishing of symptoms from anxiety, depression and other mental disorders, as well as insomnia. Topicals work brilliantly at reducing inflammation, arthritis, headaches, cramping and migraines, and some evidence has shown that it can also heal eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis and itching.
CBD concentrates typically contain the strongest dosage of CBD compared to any other CBD products. It can contain up to 10 times the average CBD products. Concentrates are also convenient in that it only takes a few seconds to consume. Overall, CBD concentrates seem to be most popular among customers who are extremely busy, yet seek high potency CBD.
Cannabinoids are a class of compounds that interact with receptors throughout your body. CBD is just one of dozens of cannabinoids found in cannabis, including tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which is the one responsible for marijuana’s famous high. Medical cannabis is technically any cannabis product used for medicinal purposes, and these can contain THC or CBD or both, said Nick Jikomes, a neuroscientist at Leafly, a website that provides information about legal cannabis. “A common mistake people make is to think that CBD is ‘the medical cannabinoid’ and THC is ‘the recreational cannabinoid.’” That’s inaccurate, he said, because THC is a potent anti-inflammatory and can be helpful for pain.
Ingredients: Aloe Barbadensis (Aloe Vera) Leaf Juice*, Purified Water, Carthamus Tinctorius (Safflower) Oleosomes, Butyrospermum Parkii (Shae) Butter*, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Oil*, Vegetable Glycerin**, Cetearyl Olivate, Sorbitan Olivate**, Mangifera Indica (Mango) Seed Butter*, Lactobacillus Ferment (from Cabbage)**, Lactobacillus, Cocos Nucifera (Coconut) Fruit Extract**, CW Hemp Oil CO2 Extract, Mentha Piperita (Peppermint) Leaf Extract, Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Curcuma Longa (Turmeric) Root Extract, Salix Alba (Willow) Bark Extract, Cimicifuga Racemosa (Black Cohash) Root Extract, Prunus Armeniaca (Apricot) Kernel Oil*, Simmondsia Chinensis (Jojoba) Seed Oil*, Glyceryl Stearate (Palm Oil Derived), Xanthan Gum, Panthenol (Vitamin B5), Tocopheryl Acetate (Vitamin E), Cyamopsis Tetragonolobus (Guar) Gum*, Sodium Benzoate, and Potassium Sorbate.
Despite this, CBD is something nobody knows much about, and certainly nobody is monitoring it properly. CBD is widely marketed as a supplement, despite the Food and Drug Administration saying it does not qualify as such (this is because it is an active ingredient in drugs which are either approved or under investigation to be approved). CBD goes largely unregulated by the agency; on the FDA’s FAQ page, a vague answer maintains there are “many factors in deciding whether or not to initiate an enforcement action.” The Department of Agriculture handles research grants and pilot programs for hemp, but that’s where its involvement ends.
During one study, 10 healthy male participants took just one 600 mg dose of CBD oil. Their resting blood pressure went down successfully. These same men were then put on stress tests. These tests were specifically designed to raise blood pressure. After taking the same dose of CBD, the men yielded positive results. Their blood pressure was lower than it normally would be in these stressful situations. Most scientists agreed that CBD lowers blood pressure because of its ability to help reduce anxiety and stress.
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Given the degree to which marijuana and cannabinoid derivative use has been stigmatized in the past, their Schedule I classification as illegal substances, and lack of FDA approval, valid medical research on the effects of CBD isn’t as plentiful as it should be. Much of the anecdotal evidence, however, suggests that CBD’s neuro- protective, analgesic, and anti-inflammatory effects with regard to topical applications are promising.2
Preliminary research indicates that cannabidiol may reduce adverse effects of THC, particularly those causing intoxication and sedation, but only at high doses.[23] Safety studies of cannabidiol showed it is well-tolerated, but may cause tiredness, diarrhea, or changes in appetite as common adverse effects.[24] Epidiolex documentation lists sleepiness, insomnia and poor quality sleep, decreased appetite, diarrhea, and fatigue.[3]
Further explanation is in order. The difference between psychoactive cannabis (“marijuana,” by the increasingly disfavored traditional term) and hemp is a question of THC content — and legal classification. The federal government defines hemp as cannabis with 0.3 percent THC or less in terms of dry weight. The 2014 federal Farm Bill legalized state pilot programs for hemp, and 40 of the 50 states now have defined industrial hemp as distinct from cannabis and removed barriers to its production — including California. However, California’s hemp pilot program is overseen by the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA) — not either the CDPH or Bureau of Cannabis Control.
Sativex, an oral spray containing both CBD and THC, can treat MS-induced pain. During one study, researchers gave Sativex to 47 participants with MS. Results were largely positive. Patients who used this spray felt notably better. Their muscle and walking spasms decreased, and they felt pain relief. Thanks to studies such as this one, several countries approved using Sativex in MS treatment.
Hey, I’m a simple guy; I like my ice cream cold, my t-shirts tight, and my coffee alarmingly strong. With the relaxation of marijuana laws in some U.S. states, it seems an array of industries have started cashing in on the great green prize by offering CBD-infused products—which is legal almost everywhere. Moisturizer, sugar, lube, and—of course—coffee.  Not to be dramatic, but CBD coffee is a ridiculous trend that’s turning grown adults into giant throbbing knobs. Here’s why.
It is well known that cannabis plants obtained from uncontrolled sources may be contaminated with various harmful substances [39], sometimes leading to severe health issues or hospitalization [40]. Contaminants include chemicals that were intentionally added in order to increase yield, weight, or potency (e.g., pesticides, metal particles [41], synthetic cannabinoids [42]) but also agents that entered the plant unintentionally (e.g., heavy metals, molds and bacteria [43], aflatoxins). For example, pesticides are frequently present in cannabis sold by Dutch coffee shops [44], but were also found in cannabis offered under state law in California [45] as well as medicinal cannabis from licensed producers in Canada [46]. If any of these contaminants were present in hemp used for CBD extraction, they would likely end up in a concentrated form in the final oil. One contaminant specifically relevant to cannabis (CBD or THC) oils is the residual presence of toxic solvents used during the extraction procedure [3].
Researchers like Blessing are legitimately excited about CBD. It shows real promise in treating previously intractable disorders like schizophrenia, and without the destructive side effects of existing drugs. Still, that doesn’t mean CBD is harmless. Research on drug interactions with CBD is in its infancy, but what is known within the medical community is that CBD can cause serious problems for people taking certain classes of drugs, namely SSRIs (a group of antidepressants including Zoloft and Prozac) and opioids.
Leafly is the world’s largest cannabis information resource, empowering people in legal cannabis markets to learn about the right products for their lifestyle and wellness needs. Our team of cannabis professionals collectively share years of experience in all corners of the market, from growing and retail, to science and medicine, to data and technology.
A: Our Hemp Oil is regulated to contain no levels of THC as per the legal limits of the State of Idaho. Our Premium Hemp Oil is also tested and contains no levels of THC. Our Hemp Oil and Premium Hemp Oil are both 100% from the Cannabis plant (save the Peppermint Essential Oil Flavoring and Stevia in our Peppermint option). We do not dilute or use any fillers such as Medium Chain Triglycerides (MCT), Vegetable Glycerin, or other fillers.  
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