Most people drink coffee to wake them up in the morning, give them a little burst of energy during the day, or a pick me up after a stressful day at work. Coffee gets a bad rap, but it is actually a healthy choice. If you are an avid coffee drinker, you are already getting many coffee benefits. If you aren’t, check out what coffee has to offer you:
McGuire published his own study in August, in which CBD was shown to reduce psychotic episodes in people with schizophrenia. The daily dose was 1,000mg of pure CBD. And a study in which CBD seemed to ease anxiety, published in Nature in 2011, administered a single dose of 600mg, an hour and a half before giving participants a public speaking task. These larger doses contrast with that found in, say, Botanical Labs’ CBD drink. Rebekah Hall, the company’s founder, says her drink is for recreational rather than medicinal purposes and “the amount of CBD per batch is constant and precise, at 2mg per bottle”. A daily dose of two hemp capsules made by Nature’s Plus offers 15mg of mixed “plant cannabinoids” without a specific CBD count.
I've talked before how walking the aisles of the grocery store is one of my favorite pastimes. There's something incredibly soothing about being in my own little bubble, alone (hi, I'm an introvert), while also doing my bod some good by crafting a nourishing menu for the week. Further, Erewhon Market, L.A.'s iconic, super-healthy-eating pit stop, is my ultimate mecca. It was there that I discovered my first gateway into the land of CBD-concocted sips. On the search for a quick hit of caffeine, I was scanning the wall of cold-brew potions when my eyes landed on Kickback, sweetly bottled tea and coffee brews spiked with a strategic amount of CBD. With five different enticing flavor profiles to choose from, I ultimately landed on Coffee Date, a delicious and ultra-clean melding of organic coffee, organic coconut milk, organic date syrup (a healthier, non-refined sweetener), and, of course, extracted hemp. Numerically speaking, one bottle contains a perfectly proportioned balance of caffeine (80 milligrams) and CBD (20 milligrams). Slightly nervous, I bagged it and headed to the checkout.

Recently, an interesting study performed in the Netherlands highlighted multiple issues that may be extrapolated to CBD products elsewhere [51]. In this study, 46 different cannabis oil samples were collected directly from patients and analyzed for cannabinoid content. The obtained samples were home-made (n = 29) or purchased from a (web) store (n = 17). For 21 of the 46 products (46% of all samples), label information was available on CBD/THC content, so that the claimed content could be compared to the analyzed content as determined in the study. Results are shown in Table 1. In many cases the analyzed cannabinoid content strongly differed from the claimed content on the label, while in 7 samples no cannabinoids (CBD or THC) were found at all. Such deviations were found in home-made as well as commercially obtained products.


I think being safe to eat is a moot point. These are topical products. I don’t think anybody is buying to eat them. It’s just a marketing tactic. In regards to the chapsticks, unless you were trying to literally eat the chapstick I think whatever negligible amount may make it past your lips and into your mouth, would certainly not be a health concern from any of these products. What concerns me more is there is zero efficacy with all of these products. Do they just decide over breakfast how much CBD needs to be added for the dosage to work? It’s ridiculous that they are marketing it as safe to eat, and people are buying into that bs and providing no clinical studies or research at all. Just my 2 cents

Stephanie, generally, I have patients take 20 to 150mg a day for sleep +/- anxiety. Start low and go slow. Know the dosages of your product. Usually 2/3 to 3/4 of the daily dose is 1-2 hours before bedtime, and the other portion is upon waking (to improve wakefulness during the day). Other factors such as stress, hormone replacement, other meds & medical conditions, etc. play a role along with individual differences. I own a compounding pharmacy, so we see a lot of unique needs. I can't give more specific advice in this forum, but there is help!
The limited studies out there indicate that CBD has, in its various interactions with the brain and immune system, some anti-inflammatory and anti-anxiety effects. It can balance out the effects of THC by reducing the anxiety THC sometimes brings, and many in the industry are big on “broad spectrum” or “full spectrum” configurations, which use many cannabinoids at once.

Once the oil has been applied, massage it gently but firmly into your skin. The body won’t absorb much of the cannabinoid in small doses, so be sure to apply liberally. Once you’re done, make sure you wash your hands so you do not inadvertently spread potentially irritable substances to sensitive areas. Some oils contain substances that may cause discomfort and irritation to the wrong parts of the body, such as the eyes.


Hemp Extract Oil* and Hemp Oil are from a different Cannabis plant called Cannabis Sativa.  Hemp Extract is made from the entire plant including leaf, seed and stem.  Most oils on the market selling as C B D oil are 97% or more Hemp Seed Oil, mct oil or vegetable glycerine and 3% Hemp Extract. This does not contain THC and is legal in all 50 states.
I think being safe to eat is a moot point. These are topical products. I don’t think anybody is buying to eat them. It’s just a marketing tactic. In regards to the chapsticks, unless you were trying to literally eat the chapstick I think whatever negligible amount may make it past your lips and into your mouth, would certainly not be a health concern from any of these products. What concerns me more is there is zero efficacy with all of these products. Do they just decide over breakfast how much CBD needs to be added for the dosage to work? It’s ridiculous that they are marketing it as safe to eat, and people are buying into that bs and providing no clinical studies or research at all. Just my 2 cents
While we hope you’ll give our CBD latte a try, making CBD coffee doesn’t have to be complicated. Adding a little flavorful drop of CBD oil to your morning coffee is a simple step to start your day out healthier and happier! Of course, there’s no reason you can’t add it to your afternoon pick-me-up cup, too. Either way, it’s a great step in the right direction.
As an alternative health regimen, CBD holds particular appeal to women, said Gretchen Lidicker, the health editor of Mindbodygreen, a wellness website based in New York, and the author of “CBD Oil Everyday Secrets.” Noting the preponderance of female-run CBD businesses, Ms. Lidicker, 26, said that it is “no surprise that women are leading the CBD movement.”
Most CBD oils are available in round-number concentrations such as 250mg, 500mg, and 1,000mg. While these strengths accommodate many CBD users, they may not be sufficient for those with preferences that fall outside round numbers. NuLeaf Naturals offers a less conventional selection of concentrations: 240mg, 725mg, 1,450mg, 2,425mg, and 4,850mg. This range ensures that most users will find a strength that works for them.

Our Editor’s Pick is the tincture from CBDistillery. This tincture is available in five strengths ranging from 250mg to 5,000mg, which accommodates a wide range of THC preferences, as well as 15 and 30 milliliter containers. The tincture has a price-point that is slightly below average, making it a good option for value seekers. The tincture, which is non-flavored, routinely undergoes third-party testing to ensure safety and high quality; the testing results are available on CBDistillery’s product pages.

CBD Topical

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