Researchers like Blessing are legitimately excited about CBD. It shows real promise in treating previously intractable disorders like schizophrenia, and without the destructive side effects of existing drugs. Still, that doesn’t mean CBD is harmless. Research on drug interactions with CBD is in its infancy, but what is known within the medical community is that CBD can cause serious problems for people taking certain classes of drugs, namely SSRIs (a group of antidepressants including Zoloft and Prozac) and opioids.
Among beauty products alone, CBD has already achieved cliché status, popping up in blemish creams, sleeping masks, shampoos, hair conditioners, eye serums, anti-acne lotions, mascaras, massage oils, soaps, lip balms, bath bombs, anti-wrinkle serums, muscle rubs and a Sephora aisle’s worth of moisturizers, face lotions and body creams. Even the bedroom is not safe from the CBD invasion, to judge by the spate of CBD sexual lubricants on shelves.
New methods of cannabis consumption are bringing us further away from the notion that marijuana belongs solely in a bong or joint – or that it has to get you high, for that matter. Cannabis-infused topicals are an example of how new modes of consumption are revolutionizing perceptions of marijuana as their accessibility, safety, and efficacy invite even the most unlikely patrons into the world of medical cannabis.
These dosages are pretty standard in the consumer CBD industry and, per the research available, nowhere near the doses proven to be effective in clinical trials. NuLeaf Naturals, a prominent online CBD seller, sells 240 mg of oil for $38.50. It does not specify dosage but measures its CBD concentration in single drops; there are 100 drops per bottle, each containing 2.4 mg. You would have to take the entire bottle, according to Blessing, to get close to the absolute minimum dose that studies show might be effective for reducing anxiety. A $3 squirt of CBD oil on your ice cream or coffee? Probably right around 10 mg. You’d need 30 times that amount to get to the levels at which researchers have found stress-relieving results.
Hi Bev, I am curious my husband has the exact same issues, and then ends up picking his poor head like crazy which aggravates the scalp sores. We figured out that he has extremely thick hair and the follicles are too densely packed together and his scalp cannot breathe. Since we figured that out he has been going in for hair cuts where they thin his hair out a lot as well as cut it so his scalp can breathe….. Overall he is doing much better as long as we stay on top of the hair trims and thinning cuts but if he doesn’t go in regularly he is back to the irritation. BTW topical MMJ is great but they can be very oily and have compound stuff in them that can further irritate the scalp possibly etc. so maybe not great for scalp… 🙂 I have traumatic injuries from a car accident and the MMJ topical creams have saved my life…..
Check Dr. Stephen Porges’ work, as well as Stanley Rosenburg. Both treat trauma and the vagus nerve’s role in bodily symptoms, which cause a lot of the symptoms you mention, as well as other people here. Some of Stanley Rosenburg’s simple exercises along with Stephen Porges’ work, can realign the vagus nerve and when done regularly have a cumulative effect. Basically, most symptoms, even seizures can be caused by misalignments and/or contracted muscles, (even the tiniest muscle in the human body, the stapedius muscle when chronically contracted can cause havoc on body) all under the umbrella of the vagus nerve (polyvagal nervous system). This is very well researched and is cutting edge treatment without the use of drugs of any kind. Some of Porges’ treatments use music, believe it or not, specially designed headsets with bone conduction. But please research, there are therapists trained in this field and in meantime, you can self-apply Stanley Rosenburg’s Basic Exercise, as well as others, first and you will see drastic results.

Cannabis oils may contain various concentrations of CBD, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and minor cannabinoids, mainly depending on the cannabis variety used for extraction. The most popular product currently is CBD oil, but for example cannabigerol (CBG)-rich oil has been spotted as well [2], and others will very likely follow soon. The THC-rich type of cannabis oil has already been known for some years, and is generally known under the name “Simpson oil” [3]. Terpenes may or may not be present in these products, depending on the preparation method used [4]. Because they are highly volatile, elevated temperatures (such as those applied during drying of plant materials, or during the evaporation of solvents) may result in a significant loss of terpene components [5]. However, it is possible to capture evaporated terpenes by condensation, and reintroduce them back into the final oil. Additional ingredients may be added to further adjust properties such as color, viscosity, taste, or shelf-life stability.
Science has confirmed that cannabis is an effective pain reliever, reinforced in a massive new report from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. But there's a big difference between ingesting cannabis or its individual chemicals orally and absorbing it through your skin. Here, the lowdown on this new crop (no pun intended) of pain relievers.
INGREDIENTS: ALCOHOL DENAT., HAMAMELIS VIRGINIANA (WITCH HAZEL) WATER, WATER (AQUA), PROPYLENE GLYCOL, ALCOHOL, LIDOCAINE, POLYSORBATE 20, GLYCERIN, CANNABINOID EXTRACT, ARNICA MONTANA FLOWER EXTRACT, ALOE BARBADENSIS LEAF EXTRACT, EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS LEAF OIL, MENTHA PIPERITA (PEPPERMINT) OIL, CAMPHOR, MENTHOL, TOCOPHERYL ACETATE, ALLANTOIN, SODIUM BENZOATE, POTASSIUM SORBATE.
But one of the big differences between CBD and THC is, according to Jane West, cannabis activist, entrepreneur, and founder of the marijuana networking group Women Grow, that CBD is non-intoxicating. “Its potential benefits come with few or no adverse effects,” West tells MarieClaire.com. “So really, this is something that everyone, even those who are reluctant to consume cannabis, can try to incorporate beneficial cannabinoids into their lives without any sort of high or residual THC in their bloodstream.”
Plus CBD Oil™ products come in a variety of flavors and concentrations to suit your preferences. If you are considering CBD oil for your health, as with any supplement, we encourage you to speak with your physician and dive into the research to learn more about this promising phytonutrient. We at Plus CBD Oil™ are proud of our innovative selection of products.

While we hope you’ll give our CBD latte a try, making CBD coffee doesn’t have to be complicated. Adding a little flavorful drop of CBD oil to your morning coffee is a simple step to start your day out healthier and happier! Of course, there’s no reason you can’t add it to your afternoon pick-me-up cup, too. Either way, it’s a great step in the right direction.

Keep in mind that CBD levels may vary from crop to crop—even from plant to plant. However, below are some strains that have been bred to contain higher CBD levels, so they might be a good place to start. Check the map on their strain page to see if these are sold at a dispensary near you. We also recommend checking with dispensaries about the specifics of their strains’ CBD levels. It’s always a good idea to purchase only lab-tested products that clearly state the CBD/THC levels so you know what kind of experience to expect.
Both CBD oil and CBD cream products have their own unique and significant uses throughout the medical world. They are both highly capable of healing and diminishing pain plus daily discomforts. This all-natural alternative to conventional medications is reasonably affordable and does not produce any of the psychoactive or “high” effects that traditional marijuana flower can, meaning that CBD could be consumed any day of the week at any time of day, leading to its extreme versatility and convenience.
As it turns out, CBD (short for cannabidiol) is a phenomenal natural therapy for literally dozens and dozens of different ailments. General pain relief is probably the single most common reason that people take CBD, but it’s also proven to be extremely effective for psychological conditions like anxiety and depression, as well as for things like chronic seizures/epilepsy, diabetes, migraines, neurodegenerative disease (multiple sclerosis, fibromyalgia), digestive issues, and even menstrual cramps.
Hi, I have had spondylolisthesis since age 11 which left me with extreme nerve pain...restless leg syndrome. Had 3 spinal ops and also had hip surgery 2 years ago. have asthma and hypothyroidism. I can deal with everything else but this nerve pain is insane. Used Gabapentin for 9 years and now its not in the market in Nairobi, Kenya where I live. Am on Lyrica, which is not working. I started Cbd oil in August but now found my body has become immune to the effects of pain releif I was getting. Can anyone suggest what strength oil/cbd supplement I should aim for? Currently am making flapjacks with weed, have one every night but this makes me high which I dont want. I still wake up in pain at night, please help.

The Health effects of cannabis and cannabinoids: the current state of evidence and recommendations for research. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Health and Medicine Division; Board on Population Health and Public Health Practice; Committee on the Health Effects of Marijuana: An evidence review and research agenda. Washington, National Academies Press, 2017.

Among beauty products alone, CBD has already achieved cliché status, popping up in blemish creams, sleeping masks, shampoos, hair conditioners, eye serums, anti-acne lotions, mascaras, massage oils, soaps, lip balms, bath bombs, anti-wrinkle serums, muscle rubs and a Sephora aisle’s worth of moisturizers, face lotions and body creams. Even the bedroom is not safe from the CBD invasion, to judge by the spate of CBD sexual lubricants on shelves.

Ingredients: Purified Water, Aloe Barbadensis Leaf Extract, Squalane, Glycerin, Stearic Acid, Cetyl Alcohol, Stearyl Alcohol, Ethylene Glycol Distearate, Menthol, Sodium Acrylates Copolymer, Cannabis Sativa Seed Oil, Arnica Montana Flower Extract, Boswellia Serrata Extract, Allantoin, Propylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Ethylhexylglycerin, Lecithin, Glycerylstereate, Peg 100, Stereate, Diasonilidyl, Tocopherol Acetate

While the CBD latte dosage varies from coffee shop to coffee shop, the range seems to fall between two to 15 drops, or approximately 20 to 30 milligrams, says Blessing. That’s a lot less than what’s been shown to work in clinical trials for various conditions, which makes Blessing skeptical that a CBD latte could produce any noticeable effect. “There’s no evidence whatsoever that a small amount of CBD is actually doing anything at all,” she says. “An analogy I give sometimes is, you wouldn’t take 2 mg of ibuprofen. It doesn’t do anything.”
Though a CBD latte might not do much for you — at least not beyond what caffeine and the placebo effect combined can do, which isn’t nothing — it’s also probably harmless in most cases, says Carson, and may even have positive benefits we aren’t yet aware of. “I suspect there’s probably some antioxidant benefit to CBD like there is with coffee,” says Carson. “There’s tons of good things in coffee that we still don’t fully understand, and I think the marijuana plant is much the same way.” 

CBD Topical Lotions

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