You guys remember coffee, right? You drink it in the mornings to wake yourself up and drown the urge to crawl back into bed. No matter how you take your coffee—black, sweet, over ice, or up your butt—it can be surmised you’re drinking it to absorb the caffeine. See, when caffeine molecules attach themselves to your A1 receptors, your brain can’t tell the difference between these molecules and a neurochemical called adenosine—the stuff that gets you tired. Thus, your brain fools itself into staying awake—that’s why we drink coffee.
Cannabidiol is currently a class B1 controlled drug in New Zealand under the Misuse of Drugs Act. It is also a prescription medicine under the Medicines Act. In 2017 the rules were changed so that anyone wanting to use it could go to the Health Ministry for approval. Prior to this, the only way to obtain a prescription was to seek the personal approval of the Minister of Health.
As marijuana is legalized in more and more states, the wellness world has whipped itself into a frenzy over a non-intoxicating cannabis derivative called cannabidiol. CBD products can be found on the internet and in health-food stores, wellness catalogs and even bookstores. (A bookstore in downtown Boulder, Colorado, displays a case of CBD products between the cash register and the stacks of new releases.) Celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow, disgraced cyclist1 Floyd Landis and former Denver Broncos quarterback Jake Plummer are all touting CBD products, and according to Bon Appétit, CBD-infused lattes have become “the wellness world’s new favorite drink.”
Topicals are applied right to trouble areas so that the CBD oil can work directly where it’s needed most. Ingesting CBD products orally causes CBD and other compounds to enter the bloodstream, which elicits full-body effects and takes up to 2 hours or more before those effects are experienced. With CBD topicals, the healing compound and other hemp-derived nutrients are almost immediately absorbed directly through your skin, allowing them to target the affected area for quicker and more focused effects.  
One of the strongest nutraceutical CBD oils is called Charlotte’s Web, with a 50mg dose. Charlotte’s Web is produced in Colorado by the Stanley Brothers, and named after Charlotte Figi, a girl who became famous in the US after her frequent seizures, brought on by the rare Dravet syndrome, were greatly reduced when she started taking CBD oil aged five. The company makes THC products too and is extremely successful, having just offered shares on the Canadian securities exchange, raising about $100m.
“CBD is the most promising drug that has come out for neuropsychiatric diseases in the last 50 years,” said Dr. Esther Blessing, an assistant professor at New York University School of Medicine, who is coordinating a study of CBD as a treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder and alcohol use disorder. “The reason it is so promising is that it has a unique combination of safety and effectiveness across of very broad range of conditions.”
Though clinical and anecdotal evidence suggests CBD’s benefits in managing different conditions, it became most famous for treating a rare and debilitating form of pediatric epilepsy. Dravet’s Syndrome is notoriously resistant to current approved treatment methods. Sufferers are plagued by seizures, often up to hundreds a day, that worsen as they age and can be life-threatening. Currently, treatment methods include having the child wear an eyepatch, specialized diets, and brain surgery, but all have mixed success rates.
I am interested in finding a cannabidiol pill, capsule, or gelcap of at least 15mg to use as a nightly sleep aid. I hope to find one with a THC content of 1.5mg or less that I can purchase in quantity to keep the price per dose as low as possible. I live in Washington State, where marijuana in all its forms is legal for those 21 years or older. I am curious if anyone knows whether buying this type of product is less expensive as a medical prescription in Washington than it is when purchased over-the-counter. I am also interested in possibly purchasing on-line a product that meets the criteria mentioned above, if any of you know of such product. Please share anything you know that can help me.

A lighter concentration of CBD but very convenient to use. You can buy the spray or make your own. Spray it directly in your mouth or even just a mist around you. It’s great for relaxing and stress relief. You can also use for pain by spraying directly on your skin. You can easily take it with you so you have it every day. You can spray a bit on your pulse points for times of stress and anxiety.

The fact that the maximum CBD content in an oil is limited by the THC present in the herbal material used makes it attractive to add an additional amount of purified CBD to boost the percentage advertised on the label. Unfortunately, the Novel Food Catalogue of the EU states that “extracts of Cannabis sativa L. in which CBD levels are higher than the CBD levels in the plant source are novel in food” [35]. This means that enriching a natural hemp extract with pure (often synthetic) CBD makes it a Novel Food product, with the consequence that it must undergo significant safety assessment prior to being marketed. However, it is still unclear in many EU countries if extracts with no added CBD also fall under this regime.
I tried a high CBD caplet with no THC. Unfortunately, I found it to be ineffective as a sleep aid, although it eases my chronic pain. Therefore, I take it when I arise for the day. I found an over-the-counter (Washington State) tincture called “beauty sleep” is working for me as a sleep aid. It costs me about $3.00 per night. It tastes yucky, but it works. I put two droppers full of the tincture under my tongue and keep it there for as long as I can before swallowing it. I am able to sleep about 7 hours per night with only one interruption to use the bathroom. This tincture contains 57% THC, which I was trying to avoid, but it is worth it. I do not use it to fall asleep, but to stay asleep. I wait to take it until I am really sleepy. It takes about 90 minutes for it to take effect, which is when I am already sleeping. Without it, that is about when I would be waking up and not being able to get back to sleep. If I take it before I am really sleepy, it just gives me the munchies and I do not need the extra calories. I feel kind of stoned when I wake up to pee, but I get back to sleep a lot better than I did before I started using the tincture. I have not built up a tolerance to it (so far) which is a concern because I do not want to be needing increasingly more as time goes by.. I have been using it for about four months now and am hopeful that it will continue to be effective without needing to increase the dosage. Maybe BEAUTY SLEEP will work for you. It sure has improved my quality of life. Now I am not so narcoleptic and low-energy during the day. Good luck finding a solution to your sleep issues.
Despite this, CBD is something nobody knows much about, and certainly nobody is monitoring it properly. CBD is widely marketed as a supplement, despite the Food and Drug Administration saying it does not qualify as such (this is because it is an active ingredient in drugs which are either approved or under investigation to be approved). CBD goes largely unregulated by the agency; on the FDA’s FAQ page, a vague answer maintains there are “many factors in deciding whether or not to initiate an enforcement action.” The Department of Agriculture handles research grants and pilot programs for hemp, but that’s where its involvement ends.

CBD Topical Creams

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