An important issue in the discussion around cannabis-derived oils is: how much THC is a legal CBD product allowed to contain in order not to be considered a narcotic? Authorities sometimes choose to deal with these regulations in a pragmatic way, recognizing that laws once designed to control marijuana abuse may not be fully applicable to hemp. For example, in the Netherlands, a maximum level of 0.05% THC is allowed in CBD products, even though, formally, any detectable trace of THC is illegal according to Dutch narcotics laws. This approach is based on the fact that even hemp varieties of cannabis produce a small amount of THC, and therefore naturally derived CBD extracts will carry some THC in the final products.
The topical menthol ointment is our most common product for direct application to sore joints, muscle tissue, and damaged skin areas. Standard CBD oil drops can take up to an hour (or longer) to take effect (since they have to enter into the bloodstream), but with topical creams, effects are typically felt within minutes as the active cannabidiol simply has to diffuse across the dermal layers and to the site of inflammation.
Larilyn, Great question. Most CBD oils are hemp-derived, which, by definition, means they generally contain 0.3 percent THC. That being said, there is no way to guarantee that a person will pass a UA screening due to variables within that persons composition & other influences. Some people will turn to a isolate version zero percent THC of CBD for this reason but in doing so will not reap the benefits of full spectrum. I prefer the option of Enterouge oil for these candidates.
On a sunny but unseasonably freezing April afternoon in New York, I walked the 10 or so minutes from the L train to Caffeine Underground, a coffee shop in Bushwick that triples as an art gallery and community center. The open-concept space serves lattes and espressos and a variety of milks (oat, almond, macadamia) and plenty of “wellness” options (Kava tea, Bulletproof-style coffee, activated charcoal add-ins). But there’s one totally unique item: Cannabidiol-infused (CBD) coffee.
You may notice hemp seed oil as an ingredient in some of your beauty products or while shopping at the grocery store. Although hemp seed oil is very beneficial, it is not the same as CBD oil. Hemp seed oil does not contain CBD. Hemp seed oil is acquired by pressing only the hemp seeds. It is important that you are buying cold pressed, unrefined hemp seed oil because it hasn’t been depleted from its beneficial constituents. Cold pressed, unrefined hemp oil is dark to light green in color, with a nutty flavor. Refined hemp seed oil is clear and colorless, with little flavor and is depleted in natural vitamins and antioxidants.

Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a natural phyto-cannabinoid (or plant-based chemical compound) found in cannabis plants, including hemp and marijuana. Unlike other cannabinoids — namely tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC — CBD does not produce any psychoactive effects, and will actually counteract these effects to a degree. CBD will induce feelings of sleepiness; for this reason, it can be an effective soporific for people who struggle to fall and/or remain asleep due to insomnia and other sleep disorders.


A 2017 article published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine conducted a study in which the results concluded, “In adults with chronic pain, patients who were treated with cannabis or cannabinoids are more likely to experience a clinically significant reduction in pain symptoms.” This statement is quite a massive development for the increasing of tolerance towards CBD and CBD based products.
Another interesting observation was the presence of high levels of non-decarboxylated cannabinoids in multiple samples. It is well known that CBD and THC are not produced as such by the metabolism of the cannabis plant. Instead, cannabinoids are excreted in the form of carboxylic acids such as CBD-acid and THC-acid [52]. The physiological effects of these “acidic” cannabinoids have been studied only to a very limited extent. Only after proper heating (e.g., during smoking, vaporizing, or baking with cannabis) are these natural precursors rapidly converted into the more well-known CBD and THC, respectively. This process is called decarboxylation [52]. Although decarboxylation also takes place during the production of cannabis oils (e.g., during the evaporation of solvents, or during a separate decarboxylation step as part of the production process), 7/46 samples (15%) contained > 25% of its cannabinoid content in the form of acidic cannabinoids, indicating poor control over the decarboxylation process. To address the issue, some producers simply add up the content of CBD and CBD-acid in order to boast a higher “total CBD” content on the label, while advertising this as “raw CBD.”
I live in BC Canada and the same thing is happening here. I am aligned with an amazing US hemp based CBD oil company. We now need a prescription to get the Hemp CBD in Canada yet I can walk into any medical marijuana shop w/o a prescription and get any type of medical marijuana product no problem. We will be legal for recreational use in Oct but need an Prescription for Hemp based. It’s ridiculous. Must be about who gets to make $.
Despite this, CBD is something nobody knows much about, and certainly nobody is monitoring it properly. CBD is widely marketed as a supplement, despite the Food and Drug Administration saying it does not qualify as such (this is because it is an active ingredient in drugs which are either approved or under investigation to be approved). CBD goes largely unregulated by the agency; on the FDA’s FAQ page, a vague answer maintains there are “many factors in deciding whether or not to initiate an enforcement action.” The Department of Agriculture handles research grants and pilot programs for hemp, but that’s where its involvement ends.

CBD Topical Creams

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