High-CBD strains tend to deliver very clear-headed, functional effects without the euphoric high associated with high-THC strains. They’re typically preferred by consumers who are extremely sensitive to the side effects of THC (e.g., anxiety, paranoia, dizziness). A high-CBD strain would also be a great choice for someone needing to medicate throughout the day to control pain, inflammation, anxiety, or other chronic conditions.
Side effects of CBD include sleepiness, decreased appetite, diarrhea, fatigue, malaise, weakness, sleeping problems, and others.[3] It does not have intoxicating effects like those caused by THC, and may have an opposing effect on disordered thinking and anxiety produced by THC.[7][10][11] CBD has been found to interact with a variety of different biological targets, including cannabinoid receptors and other neurotransmitter receptors.[7][12] The mechanism of action of CBD in terms of its psychoactive and therapeutic effects is not fully clear.[7]
Two additional studies in this area were done using CBD oil. In the first one, 214 participants would take 0.9 to 2.3 grams of oil per 1 pound of body weight. CBD successfully reduced seizures by a median of 36.5%. The second study focused on children who suffered from Dravet syndrome. Dravet syndrome is a type of epilepsy that happens in early infancy. Normally high temperatures and fevers trigger it. The results of the second study showed that CBD oil reduced seizures significantly.
Donald Abrams was a member of the committee that reviewed the evidence that went into producing the report, and he said that the studies they reviewed overwhelmingly used pharmaceutically available preparations that contain THC, including dronabinol, nabilone and the whole-plant extract spray nabiximols, which contains equal parts CBD and THC. It’s impossible to know whether the benefits of cannabis can also be obtained from CBD alone, Abrams said, because CBD is just one of 400 chemicals present in the plant. So far, CBD in isolation has been studied in only a handful of randomized, placebo-controlled trials (considered the gold standard of evidence in medical research), and the evidence remains sparse.
CBD does not appear to have any psychotropic ("high") effects such as those caused by ∆9-THC in marijuana, but may have anti-anxiety and anti-psychotic effects.[10] As the legal landscape and understanding about the differences in medical cannabinoids unfolds, it will be increasingly important to distinguish "medical marijuana" (with varying degrees of psychotropic effects and deficits in executive function) – from "medical CBD therapies” which would commonly present as having a reduced or non-psychoactive side effect profile.[10][60]
Cannabidiol has been found to act as an antagonist of GPR55, a G protein-coupled receptor and putative cannabinoid receptor that is expressed in the caudate nucleus and putamen in the brain.[34] It has also been found to act as an inverse agonist of GPR3, GPR6, and GPR12.[12] Although currently classified as orphan receptors, these receptors are most closely related phylogenetically to the cannabinoid receptors.[12] In addition to orphan receptors, CBD has been shown to act as a serotonin 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist,[35] and this action may be involved in its antidepressant,[36][37] anxiolytic,[37][38] and neuroprotective effects.[39][40] It is an allosteric modulator of the μ- and δ-opioid receptors as well.[41] The pharmacological effects of CBD have additionally been attributed to PPARγ agonism and intracellular calcium release.[8]
Roocroft explained his company’s low dose by saying, “Everyone’s different, so when it comes to microdosing, they can control their cup of coffee, which is a 6-ounce serving per brew.” He’s not the only person I talked to who used the term “microdosing.” Blessing says he’s misusing the term. Microdosing means using very small amounts of very powerful drugs; sometimes, this can have extremely mild or even totally different effects from what is considered a full dose. But the key is microdosing still has a provable effect.
Look up Chris Shade (quicksilver scientific) on YouTube, specifically a webinar entitled ‘Cannabidiol: The Full Story pt.2’. He is a brilliant biochemist who has been studying the biochemical effects of cannabidiol. He says that CBD has the potential to be more therapeutic than THC as it up-regulates/down-regulates gene expression in over 400 genes each way (up and down). A great balancer and extremely helpful in treating Lyme, more specifically allowing for more aggressive detoxification of the Lyme and co-infections. There is also considerably symbiosis with heavy metals, molds, EMF’s, etc. so you must also address those aspects. It’s supremely complex and even most Lyme literate docs don’t deal with all aspects. Antibiotics are often counterproductive with persistent Lyme as the spirochetes protect themselves with a biofilm that must be broken down (Interfase Plus). Protocols must be comprehensive in order to make progress. If you have not checked your CD57, do that. It’s a marker for natural killer cells commonly associated with Lyme (a simplistic explanation). The reference range is 100-300. First time I had it checked 2 years ago, it was 48. Despite modest attempts to boost my CD57 with some of the Nutramedix products, I only got 6-7 point increase per year. In April of this year, I got more aggressive with a homeopathic regimen, taking a variety of the Cowden (Nutramedix), Buhner and other products. The next time I checked CD57, two months later, it jumped 70 points… remarkable by any measure. My western blot also went from 2 bands to 5 bands as my body as finally able to mount an antibody response. I can’t say for sure which products had the biggest impact, but if I had to guess, it would be the Biocidin LSF (liposomal) and perhaps DesBio Lyme Plus. But I was also taking Samento, Burbur, Cumanda, resveratrol, glutathione, phosphatidylcholine, NanoMojo, and a variety of other things and a good supplement regimen. There is no one product answer. Cannabinoids can help with the symptoms and support a more aggressive regimen, but addressing the Lyme must be a multi-faceted effort. Be very wary of pulsed antibiotic protocols with doxycycline. It’s not out of the question, but decimating your microbiome is counterproductive.

These dosages are pretty standard in the consumer CBD industry and, per the research available, nowhere near the doses proven to be effective in clinical trials. NuLeaf Naturals, a prominent online CBD seller, sells 240 mg of oil for $38.50. It does not specify dosage but measures its CBD concentration in single drops; there are 100 drops per bottle, each containing 2.4 mg. You would have to take the entire bottle, according to Blessing, to get close to the absolute minimum dose that studies show might be effective for reducing anxiety. A $3 squirt of CBD oil on your ice cream or coffee? Probably right around 10 mg. You’d need 30 times that amount to get to the levels at which researchers have found stress-relieving results.
New methods of cannabis consumption are bringing us further away from the notion that marijuana belongs solely in a bong or joint – or that it has to get you high, for that matter. Cannabis-infused topicals are an example of how new modes of consumption are revolutionizing perceptions of marijuana as their accessibility, safety, and efficacy invite even the most unlikely patrons into the world of medical cannabis.
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Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the most abundant compounds found in cannabis. Unlike other compounds found in cannabis, CBD is legal, has no psychoactive effects, and will not make you fail a drug test. CBD should be utilized by everybody to help strengthen and maintain their physical, neurological, and psychological states for optimal living. CBD is legal in New York.
Despite this, CBD is something nobody knows much about, and certainly nobody is monitoring it properly. CBD is widely marketed as a supplement, despite the Food and Drug Administration saying it does not qualify as such (this is because it is an active ingredient in drugs which are either approved or under investigation to be approved). CBD goes largely unregulated by the agency; on the FDA’s FAQ page, a vague answer maintains there are “many factors in deciding whether or not to initiate an enforcement action.” The Department of Agriculture handles research grants and pilot programs for hemp, but that’s where its involvement ends.

CBD Topical Creams

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