Reasonably, many individuals research their information on the internet; however, some of the information found online can be misleading. CBD is still a relatively new field and we’ve noticed many reported misconceptions. CBD oil, hemp oil, THC oil, cannabis oil, and marijuana oil all refer to oils coming from the cannabis plant. However, they differ in how they are grown, extracted, and used. In this blog post, we will discuss the differences between these terms in hopes of educating the public and helping people gain a more beneficial understanding.
An important issue in the discussion around cannabis-derived oils is: how much THC is a legal CBD product allowed to contain in order not to be considered a narcotic? Authorities sometimes choose to deal with these regulations in a pragmatic way, recognizing that laws once designed to control marijuana abuse may not be fully applicable to hemp. For example, in the Netherlands, a maximum level of 0.05% THC is allowed in CBD products, even though, formally, any detectable trace of THC is illegal according to Dutch narcotics laws. This approach is based on the fact that even hemp varieties of cannabis produce a small amount of THC, and therefore naturally derived CBD extracts will carry some THC in the final products.
My coffee shop is not unusual in selling CBD products. In New York, and all over the country, you can find CBD oil in convenience stores, CBD vapes in smoke shops, and CBD tinctures and topical creams in beauty stores. You can buy CBD dog treats in Chicago, a $700 CBD couples massage in Philadelphia, and CBD chocolate chip cookies in Miami. CBD is also being combined with ice cream, savory snacks, and cocktails. Even Coca-Cola is reportedly working on a CBD-infused beverage.
THC, an intoxicating and illegal substance, is responsible for causing marijuana users to get “high.” Unlike THC, CBD is non-psychoactive because it does not act on the same pathways as THC. Thus, it is impossible to get “high” by smoking or ingesting CBD or CBD oil extracted from industrial hemp plants, as they only have minuscule traces of THC (<0.3%).
Though unflavored and priced higher than competitors, Green Roads CBD oils are made by a trusted manufacturer and use organically grown hemp. Following the CO2 supercritical fluid extraction process, board-certified pharmacists formulate the tincture by hand. Green Roads only sells CBD isolates, so if you’re looking for broad-spectrum products look to some of our other recommendations.
I used it on my mother's feet (she's 90). She is great for testing anything because she's in an incredible amount of pain and absolutely NOTHING works for her. Two hours after I applied it, she came into my room and said, "I can't believe that cream actually worked. I still don't have any pain in my toes and the bottom of my feet. It worked so well, I forgot about the pain after you put it on..." Needless to say, she looks forward to an application every evening.
If you don't live in a legalized state, you can typically still get CBD-infused creams. Since there's no regulation or standardized testing, your best bet is to find trustworthy brands who use creams free of toxins but with additional pain relievers like menthol, capsaicin, lemongrass, or camphor. Try Mary's Nutritionals Muscle Freeze ($70; marysnutritionals.com) or Elixinol's CBD Rescue Balm ($40; elixinol.com).
Kat’s Naturals offers five non-THC tinctures of varying concentrations: Heal and Naked (1,500mg), Balance (750mg), Metabolize (500mg), and Relax (300mg). All five tinctures are available in 5mL to 30mL containers, which can sustain users anywhere from five days to four weeks, depending on their dosage. Kat’s Naturals tinctures are derived from 99% pure fat soluble CBD isolate and pose no risk for yielding positive results on drug tests. For best results, Kat’s Naturals recommends ingesting three to five drops under the tongue and holding them in place for 60 seconds.
Meanwhile, so-called wellness drinks infused with CBD are gaining traction. The UK’s first has been launched by Botanic Lab, promoted as “Dutch courage with a difference”. Drinks giants Coca-Cola, Molson Coors Brewing Company and Diageo are all considering launching their own versions, while UK craft breweries such as Green Times Brewing (formerly Cloud 9 Brewing) and Stockton Brewing Company are offering cannabis-oil laced beers, and mixologists are spiking their cocktails with CBD mellowness. The fancy marshmallow maker, The Marshmallowist, has added CBD-oil flavour to its menu, promising that “you feel the effects immediately upon eating”, without specifying what those effects might be.

Complementing every small-batch roast is a full-spectrum CBD (Cannabidiol) extract that’s derived from organically-grown, outdoor hemp. While these extracts smelling of cherry and pepper are delicious in their own right, they can often overpower the original coffee notes. After years of experimentation and thousands of oftentimes unpleasant cups of coffee, we settled on a way to preserve the delicious coffee profile that we want to experience. It turns out it’s best to infuse hemp extracts directly into the naturally occurring oils expressed from the raw coffee beans during the roasting process.
I think being safe to eat is a moot point. These are topical products. I don’t think anybody is buying to eat them. It’s just a marketing tactic. In regards to the chapsticks, unless you were trying to literally eat the chapstick I think whatever negligible amount may make it past your lips and into your mouth, would certainly not be a health concern from any of these products. What concerns me more is there is zero efficacy with all of these products. Do they just decide over breakfast how much CBD needs to be added for the dosage to work? It’s ridiculous that they are marketing it as safe to eat, and people are buying into that bs and providing no clinical studies or research at all. Just my 2 cents

Clancy says his dose estimates are based on a book called CBD: A Patient’s Guide to Medicinal Cannabis: Healing Without the High. The co-author of that book is Leonard Leinow, the founder of Synergy Wellness, which calls itself a “hand crafted artisanal CBD cannabis collective.” He is not a doctor or a scientist, but he is a sculptor of erotic bronze pieces, like a yin-yang symbol made up of two interlocking penises.


An important issue in the discussion around cannabis-derived oils is: how much THC is a legal CBD product allowed to contain in order not to be considered a narcotic? Authorities sometimes choose to deal with these regulations in a pragmatic way, recognizing that laws once designed to control marijuana abuse may not be fully applicable to hemp. For example, in the Netherlands, a maximum level of 0.05% THC is allowed in CBD products, even though, formally, any detectable trace of THC is illegal according to Dutch narcotics laws. This approach is based on the fact that even hemp varieties of cannabis produce a small amount of THC, and therefore naturally derived CBD extracts will carry some THC in the final products.


On a sunny but unseasonably freezing April afternoon in New York, I walked the 10 or so minutes from the L train to Caffeine Underground, a coffee shop in Bushwick that triples as an art gallery and community center. The open-concept space serves lattes and espressos and a variety of milks (oat, almond, macadamia) and plenty of “wellness” options (Kava tea, Bulletproof-style coffee, activated charcoal add-ins). But there’s one totally unique item: Cannabidiol-infused (CBD) coffee.
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CBD has also shown promise to reduce cravings among people addicted to opioids, according to a study published in Neurotherapeutics in 2015. It may fight cancer, too. The authors of a review published in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology in 2012 wrote: “evidence is emerging to suggest that CBD is a potent inhibitor of both cancer growth and spread.”
Inhibited liver function: The liver regulates the way different drugs are metabolized within the body; this process is known as hepatic drug metabolism. Higher-than-average doses of CBD oil can slow the hepatic drug metabolism process. As a result, users may not be able to process other drugs as quickly. This is particularly concerning for CBD oil users who also take prescription medications.
Online retailers: Most CBD oils are sold through online retailers. These establishments tend to have the widest product range, and many offer free doorstep delivery. Online retailers also frequently post product reviews, allowing buyers to compare different oils based on customer experiences to determine which is best for them. These reviews can also be used to evaluate the retailer based on customer service, delivery, and product quality.
Users speak of a “body” high, as opposed to a mind-altering one. “Physically, it’s like taking a warm bath, melting the tension away,” said Gabe Kennedy, 27, a founder of Plant People, a start-up in New York that sells CBD capsules and oils. “It is balancing; a leveling, smoothing sensation in the body mostly, and an evenness of attention in the mind.”

When compared with the effects of caffeine, one could go out on a limb and say that CBD and caffeine are on different sides of the spectrum. Sure, they’re both anti-inflammatories, but you’re not as likely to fall asleep in your cereal after chugging a mug of coffee. You can see where I’m going with this, right? CBD coffee is a liquid contradiction.
For pain management, both topical and oral CBD work well, typically proving the most effective relief when utilized together. Oral CBD also assists in the diminishing of symptoms from anxiety, depression and other mental disorders, as well as insomnia. Topicals work brilliantly at reducing inflammation, arthritis, headaches, cramping and migraines, and some evidence has shown that it can also heal eczema, psoriasis, dermatitis and itching.
Several studies have found that the use of CBD oil is helpful in reducing anxiety, meaning it could be a beneficial natural remedy for sufferers. Back in 2011, a study published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology found that when people with generalised social anxiety disorder (SAD) were given 600mg of CBD oil prior to a public speaking test, as opposed to a placebo, they experienced significantly less anxiety, difficulty and discomfort during their speech.
Look up Chris Shade (quicksilver scientific) on YouTube, specifically a webinar entitled ‘Cannabidiol: The Full Story pt.2’. He is a brilliant biochemist who has been studying the biochemical effects of cannabidiol. He says that CBD has the potential to be more therapeutic than THC as it up-regulates/down-regulates gene expression in over 400 genes each way (up and down). A great balancer and extremely helpful in treating Lyme, more specifically allowing for more aggressive detoxification of the Lyme and co-infections. There is also considerably symbiosis with heavy metals, molds, EMF’s, etc. so you must also address those aspects. It’s supremely complex and even most Lyme literate docs don’t deal with all aspects. Antibiotics are often counterproductive with persistent Lyme as the spirochetes protect themselves with a biofilm that must be broken down (Interfase Plus). Protocols must be comprehensive in order to make progress. If you have not checked your CD57, do that. It’s a marker for natural killer cells commonly associated with Lyme (a simplistic explanation). The reference range is 100-300. First time I had it checked 2 years ago, it was 48. Despite modest attempts to boost my CD57 with some of the Nutramedix products, I only got 6-7 point increase per year. In April of this year, I got more aggressive with a homeopathic regimen, taking a variety of the Cowden (Nutramedix), Buhner and other products. The next time I checked CD57, two months later, it jumped 70 points… remarkable by any measure. My western blot also went from 2 bands to 5 bands as my body as finally able to mount an antibody response. I can’t say for sure which products had the biggest impact, but if I had to guess, it would be the Biocidin LSF (liposomal) and perhaps DesBio Lyme Plus. But I was also taking Samento, Burbur, Cumanda, resveratrol, glutathione, phosphatidylcholine, NanoMojo, and a variety of other things and a good supplement regimen. There is no one product answer. Cannabinoids can help with the symptoms and support a more aggressive regimen, but addressing the Lyme must be a multi-faceted effort. Be very wary of pulsed antibiotic protocols with doxycycline. It’s not out of the question, but decimating your microbiome is counterproductive.
One of the strongest nutraceutical CBD oils is called Charlotte’s Web, with a 50mg dose. Charlotte’s Web is produced in Colorado by the Stanley Brothers, and named after Charlotte Figi, a girl who became famous in the US after her frequent seizures, brought on by the rare Dravet syndrome, were greatly reduced when she started taking CBD oil aged five. The company makes THC products too and is extremely successful, having just offered shares on the Canadian securities exchange, raising about $100m.

Cannabis CBD Oil

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