In the European Union (EU), the cultivation of certain cannabis varieties is granted provided they are registered in the EU’s Common Catalogue of Varieties of Agricultural Plant Species [27] and the THC content does not exceed 0.2% of the dried flowers of the plant [28]. In Canada, hemp is allowed to contain 0.3% THC [29], while Switzerland allows up to 1% THC [30]. In most countries, viable seeds for planting may be purchased from certified seed companies only, in order to make sure that the correct hemp variety is indeed being cultivated. Additionally, hemp may typically only be grown in agricultural fields outdoors, while indoor cultivation is usually forbidden. In some countries (e.g., The Netherlands), growing hemp is allowed only with the intent to produce fibers or seeds. As a result, the act of harvesting fiber cannabis for its CBD is a violation of narcotics laws [31]. New cannabis varieties (for example developed to yield a higher content of CBD) are not (yet) registered as approved hemp varieties, and therefore cannot be freely cultivated, while the official registration process takes several years to complete.
Fast-forward a couple days and a couple bottles of the aforementioned CBD coffee later, and I was 100% sold. My wallet, however, was not. Kickback is supremely formulated with organic, high-quality ingredients, and justly, the price per pickup runs high. So when I chatted with Byrdie's wellness editor (and unofficial CBD whisperer), Victoria Hoff, the following week, she sparked the obvious idea to make my own. Of course, I love the convenience and hard-to-mimic deliciousness of Kickback, but I could easily create something just as delicious at home with a tincture of CBD oil and my favorite go-to brewing method. She was right, and for the past few weeks, I've experimented with my two favorite tinctures (both are from Charlotte's Web) to create my own anxiety-melting concoctions of coffee. My wallet has felt satisfyingly heavier.
Kent, My mother has suffered from severe migraines since she was a child. Six weeks ago, she received the hemp oil tincture (I do not know what dosage). She does not take it daily. She rubs a drop or two on her temples at the start of a migraine. The drops worked more effectively for her than her medication did, and now that is all she uses. Hope this helps.
Previously, I had reviewed hemp-based beauty topicals and THC beauty products pioneering the way for cannabis in the skincare industry. This time, I tested the diverse range of CBD oil-based beauty products, which are both potent and legally available for shipping to most states. This is the new frontier in skincare—and these companies are paving the way. Go support them before Sephora hears about this.
Cannabidiol, or CBD for short, is a phyto-cannabinoid found in cannabis plants. However, it does not cause the same psychoactive effects as other naturally occurring cannabinoids (such as tetrahydrocannabinol, or THC). CBD induces feelings of sleepiness and tranquility, making it suitable for insomnia and other sleep disorders; CBD can be used to alleviate symptoms of epilepsy, diabetes, and anxiety disorders, as well. Legality is an issue for some; all 50 states have laws governing the sale, possession, and use of CBD, and they vary significantly (see the table below for a full analysis).

Flower Power, which sells CBD-infused coffee to cafes like Caffeine Underground in New York City, puts 5 mg of CBD in each serving of coffee. The company, like many involved in the sale of CBD, is extremely careful about what it says regarding CBD’s effects for fear of FDA intervention. The standard language for CBD packaging and website documentation is similar to that of many supplements (think: milk thistle, echinacea, elderberry, turmeric) and is some variation on: “These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease or ailment.”
Despite this, CBD is something nobody knows much about, and certainly nobody is monitoring it properly. CBD is widely marketed as a supplement, despite the Food and Drug Administration saying it does not qualify as such (this is because it is an active ingredient in drugs which are either approved or under investigation to be approved). CBD goes largely unregulated by the agency; on the FDA’s FAQ page, a vague answer maintains there are “many factors in deciding whether or not to initiate an enforcement action.” The Department of Agriculture handles research grants and pilot programs for hemp, but that’s where its involvement ends.

CBD Topical Creams

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